Widen Your Circle: with The Circle Member Sangeetha

“Feminism is humanity’s imperative outrage against subordination of any kind, it serves to amplify the silenced voices of half of the world’s population, and is a necessary crucible for change committed to securing equal rights for women and men around the globe.”

This month, as part of Widen Your Circle, we have spoken to a number of our members about their involvement with The Circle and what it means to be a member!

Tell us a little about yourself

I wear a few different hats – I am a human rights barrister, an international development consultant, a writer and an activist. All of my work is focused on improving access to rights for the most vulnerable members of our global community.

As a child of immigrants who were born in pre-partition India, and as the first in my family to attend university, I have been acutely aware of injustice and inequality from a very young age.

In my practice as a barrister I specialise in asylum, immigration and international human rights matters. I have particular experience of working with vulnerable clients – be that representing unaccompanied children, victims of trafficking, victims of torture or those suffering from complex mental health problems.

In my role as a consultant I have spent many years ‘on the ground’ advising governments of fragile states and parties transitioning from conflict. This work has always focused on improving access to justice for vulnerable communities.

I now spend much of my time providing pro bono advice to asylum seekers on the ‘first shores’ of Europe. In our volatile global climate now, it seems more critical than ever to give voice to those silenced by injustice and inequality.

Why did you become a member of The Circle?

I became involved with the Circle in an unconventional way. A member of The Lawyers’ Circle posted an urgent message on social media asking if anyone knew of an asylum lawyer who was able to provide quick assistance.

In the customarily magical way of The Circle, members quickly mobilised and disseminated this call for help through their networks. By domino effect, the post soon found its way to me and I was able to provide legal advice which has resulted in a long-persecuted Sudanese journalist securing asylum.

Since then I have been deeply involved in both The Lawyers’ Circle and The Marie Colvin Journalists’ Network. I am continually impressed by the magnetic passion, dedication and immense feeling of solidarity shared by all members of The Circle. Particularly the vigour and determination of Dima, who leads The Marie Colvin Journalists Network – I am certain that the MCJN will revolutionise the way that female journalists in the MENA are supported and enabled to undertake their crucial work.

What does Global Feminism mean to you?

A simple promise to champion all pursuits of gender equality. That is, to support all of the different demands for gender equality made by feminist communities around the world, specific to their circumstance.

Feminism is not the preserve of the educated, white, wealthy, Western woman. Feminism is humanity’s imperative outrage against subordination of any kind, it serves to amplify the silenced voices of half of the world’s population, and is a necessary crucible for change committed to securing equal rights for women and men around the globe.

To me, Global Feminism seeks to unite and forge solidarity between the various qualified factions of feminism that now exist. Be it third world feminism, postcolonial feminism or chicana feminism, let us all gather together as one inclusive movement and collectively stand up against all forms of inequality and injustice. Global Feminism is the loudest, most unrelenting, united cry against gender inequality in all of its guises – women and girls, men and boys – we must all rise up and roar together

Find out more about becoming a member of The Circle here!

#WomenEmpoweringWomen #GlobalFeminism #WidenYourCircle

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