Our member Efe on #ChaiDay

 

Why did you decide to organise a Chai Day?

To help raise funds for victims of domestic violence, rape and sex trafficking. To join in and support them so they too can begin to heal and return to their world stronger.

What did organising a Chai Day make you learn about gender-based violence?

That there are different forms of gender-based violence and all of them need our attention. Because it is a major public health and human rights issues. I learned that young girls around the same age as my sister are been taking away from their mother’s arms and subjected to prostitution, been raped and abused physically and emotionally, and it needs to stop. I learned that if I can gather fierce and determined women in a room to support my cause, then we are one step closer to ending this for someone.

 

What are your top tips to organise a Chai Day?

Don’t do it alone. It is a ‘team’ event. So gather your friends, their friends, members of your family and their friends and host a Chai Day, because it will be so worth it when you include people in your world to support a great cause.

To find out how you can organise a Chai Day visit www.chaiday.org

#ChaiDay #WomenEmpoweringWomen


The Circle Committees Gathering

Photo: The Circle Committees Gathering in London, October 2018

 

We had a wonderful get together last Saturday 29 September 2018, with representatives from The Asian Circle, The Lawyers Circle, The Oxford Circle, The Italian Circle as well as our now forming London, Media and Healthcare and USA Circles! The Calgary Circle joined via the technology of the internet… I am SO proud of the work everyone has done, is doing, and is planning to accomplish in the future… Working on issues such as violence against women, sex trafficking, a living wage for women working in the garment industry, supporting the most vulnerable refugee children and mentoring young female journalists working in conflict zones. We are covering a broad selection of challenges and establishing real traction!
To think that in the same week, Jessica Simor of The Lawyers Circle, along with our Executive Director Sioned Jones, went to The Hague to have dialogue that could actually change the law on what is considered to be a ‘living wage’ for women, is an outstanding Circle accomplishment! And our Asian Circle’s partner in India, Lok Astha, have just received a ‘Spirit of Humanity’  award in recognition of their work in creating a transformative model to eliminate domestic violence and empower women!
Photo: Susan Ferner, from The Calgary Circle, joined the meeting via video conference from Canada.

 

After only three and a half years of forming our NGO, we are beginning to demonstrate our real potential.
Please join me in amplifying the message as to who we are and what we are doing, by contributing to our #OneReasonWhyIamAGlobalFeminist campaign.
With gratitude and appreciation to every single one of our dear Circle members… and much love from Annie.
To become a member of The Circle, sign up here.

One Reason Why I’m A Global Feminist

 

Annie Lennox, Founder of The Circle, on why she is a global feminist. Join the #OneReasonWhyImAGlobalFeminist movement on social media and tag Annie Lennox and @TheCircleNGO.

Like millions of women and men, I feel hugely inspired by the development of the #MeToo, Time’s Up and Women’s March movements.

I am proud to call myself a feminist and stand in solidarity with everyone who understands the vital need for change in attitudes and behaviours towards women and girls.

The feminist movement is a broad church with different interpretations, opinions and ideas. I identify myself as a ‘Global Feminist’ to describe where I’m coming from.

I believe in equality of rights, with empowerment and justice made available for every woman and girl in every corner of the world.

#OneReasonWhyImAGlobalFeminist is a call to action bringing collective meaning and value to the term ‘Global Feminism’.

Prof Pamela Gillies, Vice-Chancellor of Glasgow Caledonian University

Feminism needs to be relevant, appreciated and respected where the needs are greatest —in countries where women and girls are not even near the lowest rung of the ladder in terms of human rights. I’m impatient to see the ‘glass ceiling’ being smashed in my lifetime, so I’m inviting you to join me and The Circle, to create a massive advocacy wave to establish the term ‘Global Feminism’ and raise a better understanding about the bigger picture of global inequality.

This call to action will only take 5 minutes of your time.

Have your picture taken holding a sheet of paper with one selected handwritten reason why you identify yourself as a Global Feminist.

Post your picture on social media, using #OneReasonWhyImAGlobalFeminist and tag Annie Lennox and @TheCircleNgo so we can see your support. Feel free to help grow the campaign by tagging other organisations you support who work for the rights of women and girls and ask your friends, family and colleagues to join in too.

You will then become part of a collective wave for positive change for women’s rights around the world!

Sarah Brown, President of Theirworld.

Here are some reasons to choose from, in case you don’t already know them:

1.There are 757 million adults who cannot read or write —2 out of 3 of these are women.
2.In Africa, 28 million girls are not in education and will never step inside a classroom.
3.Over 750 million women alive today were married before their 18th birthday.
4.Every minute of the day, one young girl (aged 15-24) contracts HIV.
5.Women and girls account for 71% of human trafficking victims.
6.Every day approximately 830 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth.
7.Women make up only 22.8% of the worlds parliamentarian seats.
8. Across the world 39,000 girls under the age of 18 become child brides every day.
9. In developing countries,20,000 girls under the age of 18 give birth every day.
10. 603 million women live in countries where domestic violence is not considered a crime.
11. 41 million girls living in developing countries around the world are denied a primary education.
12. 1 in 3 women and girls are impacted by physical or sexual violence in their lifetime.

Love,

Annie Lennox


Feminist Calendar: September and October 2018

Photo credit: People’s History Museum

Our volunteer Anna Renfrew’s guide to feminism this autumn!

13 September — Indian Suffragettes, Female Identities and Transnational Networks (London)

Dr Sumita Mukherjee looks at the activities of Indian campaigners for the female vote in Asia, Europe, USA, Britain and other parts of the British Empire, and how they had an impact on campaigns in the Indian subcontinent.

In the context of her new book, she discusses the experiences of the Indian suffragettes who travelled around the world to lobby the British parliament, attend international women’s conferences and conduct speaking tours to gather support for Indian women.

Dr Mukherjee will demonstrate the ways in which the suffrage movement was a truly global enterprise, not solely confined to Britain or America, that involved and affected women from a range of diverse backgrounds.

Come to listen to this fascinating talk, have a bite to eat in the Pay What You Can Cafe and view The Women’s Hall exhibition at the same time!

14 September — The True Cost Screening (London)

As part of London Fashion Week, The Circle and the UK Asian Film Festival are organising a one-night-only screening of “The True Cost”, produced by The Circle founding member Livia Firth.

The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with Livia Firth, author of “Slave to Fashion” Safia Minney and Jessica Simor QC, co-author of The Lawyers Circle report “Fashion Focus: the Fundamental Right to a Living Wage”.

20 September — The Women’s Movement in Pakistan: Activism, Islam and Democracy (London)

Ayesha’s book details the history of women’s social, legal and political status in Pakistan as contested through its urban-based modern women’s movement. Since the 1980s, a small but influential group of activists have been advocating for their rights, the restoration of democracy and a secular state.

This began in response to the state’s growing use of Islam for political purposes, which peaked under General Zia-ul-Haq’s military rule (1977-88), during which the anti-Soviet jihad in Afghanistan and rise of political Islam worked in favor of his domestic policy of Islamization. Pakistan became an increasingly exclusionary state, with religious minorities and women facing growing discrimination.

Despite setbacks, such as another period of military rule and rise of the Taliban, activists succeeded in winning back some of their rights. Recent years have seen unprecedented legislative reform, policy changes to reverse discrimination and the first substantial increase in women’s political participation.

23 September — Women Making Change (Glasgow)

Explore the place of women in change-making with this empowering and celebratory event, presented in partnership with the Glasgow Women’s Library.

Through an afternoon of talks, panel discussions and workshops we will celebrate the achievements women have made in shaping a fairer and more balanced political, social and cultural landscape —and, in keeping with Take One Action’s raison d’être, explore current challenges in civil society, politics, media and international development.

Hear from Naila Ayesh, protagonist of “Naila and the Uprising” and founder and director of the Women’s Affairs Centre in Gaza, as she reflects on her personal experience of being on the frontlines of political change; explore how we can achieve better representation for women in policy, environmentalism, culture and academia through an inclusive panel discussion; and develop your own practical skills and understanding of activism and creative resistance through a selection of interactive workshops.

27 September — Slay In Your Lane (Glasgow)

“Slay In Your Lane: The Black Girl Bible” by Yomi Adegoke & Elizabeth Uviebinené —in Conversation with Tomiwa Folorunso at Glasgow Women’s Library

Black women today are facing uniquely challenging experiences in all aspects of their lives. Yet when best friends Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené searched for a book that addressed these challenges they realised none existed. So “Slay in Your Lane” —the lovechild of exasperation and optimism— was born.

From education, to work, to dating, to representation, money and health, this inspirational, honest and provocative “Black Girl Bible” explores the ways in which being black and female affects each of these areas —and offers advice and encouragement on how to navigate them.

Illustrated with stories from Elizabeth and Yomi’s own lives and from interviews with dozens of the most successful black women in Britain —including Amma Asante, Charlene White, Jamelia, Denise Lewis, Malorie Blackman and Dawn Butler MP— “Slay in Your Lane” recognizes and celebrates the strides black women have already made, whilst providing practical advice and inspiration for those who want to do the same and forge a better, visible future.

9 October — How Science Got Women Wrong, with Angela Saini (Oxford)

Shedding light on controversial research and investigating the ferocious gender wars in biology, psychology and anthropology, Angela Saini, to mark Ada Lovelace Day, will talk about how women are being rediscovered. She will explore what these revelations mean for us as individuals and as a society, revealing an alternative view of science in which women are included, rather than excluded.

This talk will be followed by a drinks reception, book sale and signing.

11 October — Womens’ Lives Leeds Drop-In Session (Leeds)

Womens’ Lives Leeds are holding a weekly drop-in session in the GATE every Thursday morning for women who’d like to speak to someone in confidence about their health, wellbeing or relationships.

No appointment needed, just call in to the GATE any time between 11 am and 12 pm on Thursday mornings.

Women are also welcome to their weekly women-only walk, which sets off from the GATE at 10 am.

13 and 14 October — WOW Festival Exeter

The Circle is proud to announce that we will be part of the second annual Women Of The World Festival in Exeter. The festival is taking place on 13 and 14 October across three venues —RAMM, Exeter Phoenix and Exeter Library. The programme is jam packed with artists, writers, politicians, comedians and activists. It is bound to be an inspiring and thought-provoking weekend.

The Circle’s Relationship Manager Peta Barrett will be joining a panel discussion focused on “Building the Sisterhood”. We will also be sharing information about the important part we play in the global movement for gender equality at the WOW Market Place.

We hope to see you there!

If you are based in or around Exeter and are interested in becoming a member, get in touch before the event and come say hi.

18 October — Women of Colour in UK Labour History: Film + Discussion (London)

Join us for a documentary screening about the 1976 Grunwick Strike, which was led largely by migrant women workers of South Asian origin.

The film will be followed by a panel discussion about the overlooked contribution of WOC in labour history, as well as interactions of race, class and gender in industrial action and activism.

Throughout autumn, until 31 December — A Woman’s Place: Ambleside’s Feminist Legacy (Leeds)

This exhibition at Armitt Museum in Cumbria celebrates the pioneering women who lived in the local area in times gone by —from journalist Harriet Martineau, often described as the first female sociologist, to the author and conservationist Beatrix Potter.

Until 2019 — Represent! Voices 100 Years On (Manchester)

This exhibition reflects on those who campaigned for better representation, most famously the suffragists and the militant suffragettes. The recently acquired Manchester suffragette banner will be displayed for the first time alongside sashes, brooches, photographs and cartoons, helping to paint a picture of what representation meant in 1918.

This family-friendly exhibition also questions how far we have really come in 100 years. It gives a platform to individuals and communities, including LGBT+ youth charity The Proud Trust and Safety4Sisters, who are still fighting to make their voices heard today. Crowdsourced items, including placards from the 2017 Women’s Marches and a jumpsuit from the Sisters Uncut 2018 BAFTA protest, tell the very personal stories of today’s movements and campaigns.


Facts and Myths about Sex Trafficking in Canada

Photo credit: Matthew S. Browning.

The Calgary Circle, the newest affiliate in our sisterhood of Circles, is supporting ACT Alberta, an organisation that works to end human trafficking in Alberta, Canada. To help end human trafficking it is important to understand the issue better, which is why The Calgary Circle committee members Helen Maguire and Susan Ferner have written this list of facts and myths about human trafficking in Canada. If you’d like to find out more about their work with ACT Alberta and donate, please click here.

FACT: HUMAN TRAFFICKING IS A CRIMINAL OFFENCE

The legal definition of human trafficking requires three elements:
1) the act of recruitment, transportation or harbouring a person;
2) by means of exercising control, direction or influence over their movements;
3) for the purpose of exploiting that person, typically through sexual exploitation or forced labour.

Due to the clandestine nature of trafficking, it is difficult to quantify the number and determine the types of victims, but it is believed that most trafficking victims in Canada are sexually exploited.

MYTH: TRAFFICKING IS THE SAME AS SMUGGLING

Although the idea of trafficking can invoke a nefarious vision of a victim being transported across borders under cover of darkness, the reality is often far different. Trafficking victims are not necessarily moved across international borders and approximately 94% of the cases of sex trafficking identified in Canada have occurred within its borders.

FACT: TRAFFICKING IS BIG BUSINESS

Sex trafficking can be less problematic, easier to conceal and more profitable than selling drugs. On
average, every trafficked woman in Canada generates just under $300,000 for her traffickers per year.

MYTH: ONLY CERTAIN PEOPLE ARE CONSIDERED TO BE “AT RISK”

The major risk factors for being trafficked are living in poverty; having a personal history of violence or neglect; or being otherwise vulnerable to manipulation and coercion. However, the number one risk factor is being female. Women and children from every socio-economic background are at risk and anyone can be targeted and exploited.

FACT: VICTIMS ARE PREDOMINANTELY WOMEN

Approximately 95% of trafficked victims are female: most under the age of 25. Of note, in Canada, indigenous women are disproportionately affected. Although indigenous people make up approximately 4% of the population, they account for approximately 50% of sex trafficking victims.

MYTH: VICTIMS ARE PHYSICALLY FORCED INTO TRAFFICKING

Relationships between traffickers and their victims often begin with what the victim believes to be a friendship or romantic relationship. A common technique used by traffickers is to lure teens and young women into sex trafficking by treating them well, initially. Many victims are recruited through the internet or by an acquaintance. Often, the victim is “groomed” by someone pretending to be her boyfriend or friend who promises her a better life and buys her gifts. The average age of girls who are manipulated in this manner is 13. In the case of older teens or young women, the trafficker also buys gifts and may promise her a good job in a new city. Once a relationship has developed, the trafficker is able to more easily emotionally manipulate the victim and exploit her vulnerabilities. The trafficker often becomes violent and may threaten and isolate the victim but continue to show occasional affection. Through these tactics, the trafficker gains control and the victim can be coerced into selling sex for others’ profit. Because of the nature of the relationship and how it is developed, the victim might not understand that she is being trafficked.

FACT: TRAFFICKING IS A HIDDEN CRIME

Much of the sex trade has moved away from the street to the internet. The solicitation of sex predominantly occurs online through local classified and escort pages, which makes it difficult to locate and identify sex trafficking victims. Victims often do not come forward for many reasons, including fear of retribution and further violence from their trafficker; fear of arrest because they have been coerced into performing illegal activities; lack of knowledge about their legal rights, and lack of understanding that they have been victimized and trafficked.

Prosecution is often difficult because victims are often frightened and unwilling to testify against the perpetrators. It can also be difficult to prove in court that the woman was, in fact, a victim and not a willing participant due to the coercive nature of the relationship between the victim and trafficker. Because of these reasons and more, most (60%) of trafficking cases in Canada have resulted in a decision of stayed or withdrawn whereas only 30% resulted in a guilty finding.

Written by Helen Maguire and Susan Ferner.


Feminist Calendar: July and August 2018

Now – 4th November – Frida Kahlo: Making Herself Up (London)

This V&A exhibition presents an extraordinary collection of personal artefacts and clothing belonging to the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Locked away for 50 years after her death, this collection has never before been exhibited outside Mexico.

20th July – 100 YRS Suffrage – A Feminist Festival (Leeds)

100 Years of Suffrage is a feminist festival taking part over three weekends, July 20th – August 5th. The event will be held at Aire Place Studios

The festival opens on Friday night with an exhibition featuring two feminist artists whose work, whilst working in completely different styles, looks into redefining beauty standards. This will be followed by an after party featuring women and non-binary djs.

The next event is a day of workshops and talks for women and non-binary people. It really focuses on the last 100 years of suffrage and what the next 100 years have in store for feminism. This will feature talks about suffragettes of colour, talks from women MPs and their experiences in parliament and feminist activists will discuss their battles with law changes and policy makers. This will culminate in a spoken word open mic where women and non-binary people can share their political experiences.

The final event is a peddle powered feminist cinema, showing independent films from women and non-binary directors featuring films with the theme of suffrage and how far we’ve come. Vegan food will be on sale.

The aim is to bring the community together to learn, share and celebrate the last 100 years of suffrage.

21st July – East End Suffragettes in the Archives (London)

A special day exploring East End suffragette stories in Tower Hamlets archives. A great introduction to what collections the archives hold and how to use them.

Workshop: Suffragette Sources at Tower Hamlets Archives
11:00am – 1:00pm, drop-in

Discover some of the suffragette sources from the collections at Tower Hamlets Local History Library and Archives. Read the real Woman’s Dreadnought, see our first edition copy of The Suffragette signed by its author Sylvia Pankhurst, and browse our unique collection of pamphlets, news cuttings and photographs. With an introduction from Robert Jones, Heritage Officer (Library), and then a chance to explore the material.

21st July — East End History Club Suffragette Special

2:00pm – 4:00pm, drop-in

A special edition of Tower Hamlets Archives regular East End History Club, exploring women’s lives in Tower Hamlets throughout the twentieth century. These sessions are ideal for those who are curious about local history and want to find out more. There’s no need to book, just drop in. Tea, coffee and biscuits provided.

24th July — Webinar: Refugee Women

Levels of displacement have never been higher than they are now. There are currently 68.5 million forcibly displaced people. 28.5 million of those are refugees and asylum seekers.

Refugee and asylum-seeking women and girls face challenges on multiple fronts, including their gender and their situation as displaced people. Displaced women and girls are at a higher risk of experiencing sexual violence and many have to give up their education.

Join us in our second webinar to learn about these and other challenges that millions of refugee women and girls are facing and find out more about how you can support them to overcome these challenges.

Speakers will be Laura Padoan, a UNHCR Spokesperson, and Claire Lewis, from the UNHCR Global Goodwill Ambassador Programme.

27th July – Red Light: Sex workers’ and allies’ fundraiser party (London)

The Sex Worker Advocacy and Resistance Movement (SWARM), the English Collective of Prostitutes (ECP) and Scot-Pep are having a party and you’re invited!

They’re raising money for a plaque commemorating beloved friend Laura Lee, who tragically died this year. Laura was a giant among sex work activists, a fearless campaigner and a dear comrade. They will be remembering Laura with a minute’s silence at the event.

Further money raised will go to Sex Workers’ Alliance Ireland (SWAI), who are fighting against the Nordic Model in Ireland.

Come for music, drinks, dancing and love!

3rd-27th August – Hot Brown Honey (Edinburgh)

Hot Brown Honey turn up the heat with lashings of sass and a hot pinch of empowerment in the smash-hit, genre-defying, award-winning firecracker of a show that’s taken the world by storm. Taking on intersectional feminism, cultural appropriation and female sexuality, this is a must see at the Edinburgh Fringe.

5th August – Screening of “Shireen of al-Wajala” (Leeds)

Aire Place Studios warmly welcome you to celebrate the end of “100 Years of Suffrage” with a pedal powered screening of ‘Shireen of al-Walaja’ Shireen is a powerhouse of everything it means to be a woman. As her Palestinian village shrinks, Shireen’s strength and courage grows. Please note this film features state violence.

9th August – Girl by Girl, Vote by Vote (Glasgow)

This Story Cafe Special is part of our Vote 100 programme, marking 100 years since some of the first women in Britain were granted the right to vote. Bring your daughters, granddaughters and nieces to celebrate!

Story Café Special: Girl by Girl, Vote by Vote, Thursday 9th August, 12.30pm to 2.30pm, for anyone aged 10+
This event is aimed at girls and young women 10+ but all are welcome. All children must be accompanied by an adult.

Sheena Wilkinson, one of the UK’s foremost writers for young people, will reveal the secrets behind her latest novel, Star by Star, a bold tale of Suffragettes and heroes, courage and survival.

13th August – Rose McGowan with Afua Hirsch (Edinburgh)

In 2018 the film industry, for so long a haven of misogyny and sexism, has found itself at the heart of a worldwide ‘cataclysmic global reckoning’, in which women everywhere are standing up defiantly against predatory male behaviour. In Brave, the American actress Rose McGowan recounts her fight against the Hollywood machine. Today she talks to Afua Hirsch about her campaign to help all women reclaim their lives.

Part of the Identity Parades series of events and sponsored by Open University.

16th August – Networking Summer Drinks (London)

The Circle welcomes members and their guests to a summer networking event in August. Share a cold beverage with like-minded individuals who are working with The Circle to empower some of the most marginalised women and girls in communities around the globe. At the event you can learn more about the projects we are supporting and ways that you can get involved to make a difference.

The event will take place at The Rotary, a venue with a beautiful outdoor space just outside Regent’s Park.


Processions: We have the vote. Now we want equality!

Photo: Peta Barrett at Processions, in London on 10 June 2018.

The Circle Relationship Manager Peta Barrett shares her thoughts on the Processions march that took place in four UK cities on 10 June 2018 to commemorate the Representation of the People Act centenary. Peta marched in the Processions in London along with members of The Circle and thousands of other women and girls.

Central London has never looked as beautiful as it did on Sunday 10 June 2018. The sun lit the greens, purples and whites of the suffragette colours worn by smiling women and girls of all backgrounds gathered to commemorate 100 years since the first women received the vote in the UK. I was thrilled that one of the first banners spotted read “Sisters are doing in for themselves”, lyrics from The Circle’s Founder Annie Lennox. I grabbed the opportunity for photo because it made me feel connected to all the members of The Circle gathered in London, Edinburgh, Belfast and Cardiff, all of our members who could not be there in person and the women of The Circle connected to us by our projects near and far.

 

I looked around me at the costumes, the banners, the sheer positivity of the crowd and I felt the spirit of the suffragettes with us as we walked in memory of everything they have done for us and for the long road we still need to walk for gender equality. It was wonderful to be surrounded by women and girls of all generations, some of whom had travelled from all over the UK.

The morning after Processions a close friend asked me, “who received the right to vote in the UK one hundred years ago?”

To set the scene… Up until 1918 only men aged 21 or older who owned land had the right to vote in the UK. The suffragette movement lead to the introduction of the Representation of the People Act in 1918. This allowed women over the age of thirty who owned property, or whose husbands did, the right to vote. Not all women could vote. In fact, only 22% of women living in the UK at the time received the right to vote in 1918. It is also interesting and important to mention that the Representation of the People Act also further extended the right to vote to all men over the age of 21 regardless of their property ownership status.

It would be another ten years before the Representation of People (Equal Franchise) Act 1928 was introduced into British politics, giving women equal electoral rights as men. What this tells us is that the suffragettes continued to fight together for equal rights. 22% representation was not good enough; the exclusion of any woman was unacceptable. The fight would continue until all women had the same right to vote as men. And finally, in 1928 all women aged 21 and older regardless of property ownership were given the right to vote. Sylvia Pankhurst is quoted in 1931 as saying ‘’as to the suffrage movement, it was a gathering of people of all sorts, united by one simple idea, which necessitated the surrender of no prejudice of race or class”. So, if you were at the Processions celebrations over the weekend, think of this as the dress run for some serious partying in 2028!

“What difference does political independence have?” you might ask. Women in the UK were given the right to vote in 1928 and are living in a country that the World Economic Forum (WEF) considers to be one of the most equal in their Global Gender Gap Report in 2017. By comparison, Saudi Arabia, which is ranked as one of the worst countries globally in the same report, only extended their women citizens the right to vote in 2015. Working for The Circle my focus is on the most marginalised women and girls, but I learnt that, despite having the vote for 100 years, the UK also has a lot of work to do to achieve gender equality. So as one of my favourite banners from yesterday reads – “We Have the Vote. Now We Want Equality’”. Equality for all women. And we will not stop until every woman is empowered to make her own choices and make change happen for herself.

In 2018 we find ourselves in a very different world where the stories of history are being re-examined and often criticised because they have often been told by the same perspective – overwhelmingly that of white heterosexual middle and upper-class men. Looking back on the suffragette movement I am thus further inspired when I really reflect on Sylvia Pankhurst’s words in 1931.

“… as to the suffrage movement, it was a gathering of people of all sorts, united by one simple idea, which necessitated the surrender of no prejudice of race or class”.

Sylvia Pankhurst

With only 22% of women receiving the right to vote and this being reliant on a property ownership, the majority of the women represented by that percentage would have been wealthy white women.  The suffragette movement in the UK wasn’t directly campaigning with a racial agenda to exclude ethnic minorities, which was the case in examples seen in countries like the USA, Australia and South Africa. For example, the suffragette Sophia Duleep Singh, goddaughter of Queen Victoria, was born of Indian and German-Ethiopian ethnicity. Sushama Sen (a woman of Indian ethnicity) recalls in her book Memoirs of an Octogenarian that when the suffragettes heard of her activities campaigning for the women’s vote, they invited her to join their demonstrations in Piccadilly in 1910. However, through my research I have found no evidence to suggest that specific consideration was given to women of ethnic minorities who would have been less able to realise their rights due to the oppression faced in addition to sexism. What is inspiring about the suffragette movement between 1918 and 1928 is that despite the more privileged women in UK society having received the vote in 1918, the fight for political equality continued. It unified women from all walks of life, living in the UK, to stand together for political equality, regardless of who they were. We are celebrating today because together, they won.  

In 2018 there are huge inequalities that exist between women and men. The experiences of those inequalities between women are also worlds apart. As a South African woman, the challenges I have faced because of my gender are hardly a drop in the ocean when compared to Siyanda, a woman who is committed to self-empowerment at the Nonceba Women’s Shelter in South Africa, a project supported by The Circle. The difference between us is that, in addition to sexism, Siyanda has faced challenges connected to her ethnicity, lack of access to education and financial independence, which are all beyond her control. Now in 2018 we have more knowledge, we have the gift of hind sight and we can see how the road to gender equality is longer for women who are facing discrimination on multiple fronts. I am part of the small percentage of women who are closer to equal rights than most. The suffragettes focused on women in the UK, but they did not have the internet to connect them to their global sisters. The suffragettes had bells to make noise, we have various forms of media. As women today, we also have networks and influence that the suffragettes could only dream of in 1918. With the inspiration of the suffragettes behind us and the winds of change in the global movement for gender equality powering our sails —I ask you to remember where we have come from and to please join me as we continue to fight for equality for all women, especially those who are still treated as far less equal than you or I.

 

 

 

@PetaBB
Peta Barrett is a member of The Circle since 2016 and our Relationship Manager since 2017.


Feminist Calendar: May and June 2018

 

Our volunteer Anna Renfrew is back with her list of feminist fun and fabness.

1 May — Confrontation? Doing Feminist & Anti-Racist Work in Institutions (Cambridge)

How can we confront institutions about their role in perpetuating violence and work to make institutions more open and inclusive spaces?

This panel will explore some of the paradoxes and difficulties of doing feminist and anti-racist work within institutions. Even when institutions claim to be committed to equality they are often deeply unequal and hierarchical spaces. A feminist and anti-racist project is to transform the institutions in which we work. The aim of transforming institutions is still however an institutional project: we often have to work through the structures we seek to dismantle. When our political work is resourced or supported by an institution does it become more difficult to confront the institution? Does following procedures or working in house constrain the kinds of work we can do? If for strategic reasons we try to avoid confrontation what else are we avoiding? And how and why are some of us perceived as being confrontational however we are doing the work?

The panel will be a chance to talk from as well as about our experiences of doing feminist and anti-racist work. The panel will consider who does (and does not) do the work of trying to transform institutions and how these distributions of labour can reproduce inequalities, and will discuss the costs of doing (and not doing) this labour and reflect on how institutions can exhaust us and wear us out. The panel will open up a discussion of how we can confront problems of institutional racism, institutional sexism (including sexual harassment and sexual misconduct) as well as institutional bullying.

6 May — Our Mel x gal-dem: Whose Streets? Racialised Sexual Harassment (London)

gal-dem’s panel will explore women of colour and BME women’s experiences of street harassment: the ways in which this harassment is frequently laced or combined with racism and Islamophobia and how a culture of harassment fits into the wider spectrum of violence perpetrated against women because of their gender or perceived gender.

8 May — EmpowerHerVoice Presents: Comedy Festival (Oxford)

Empower Her Voice (EHV) is bringing you a comedy festival —a night of spectacular talent hosted by Verity Babbs.

This event will be raising money to fund scholarships for girls to attend the Sanjan Nagar school in Lahore, Pakistan. Book your ticket: all ticket sales will go towards funding the entire education (12 years) of ten young Pakistani girls.

8 May — All Female* DJ Workshop (Oxford)

There is a serious lack of female representation in the DJ scene. Only 10% of performers at music festivals around the world are female and an even smaller percentage of women are on music label rosters. The Oxford scene is no different.

Here, for Hugh’s Arts Week, students at Oxford University want to redress this imbalance in the Oxford DJ scene. We’ve got an incredible, exclusively female trio of DJs from Cuntry Living Magazine. They’ll teach all you gals the ropes.

Anyone who identifies either fully or partially as woman, or who has a complex gender identity that may include “woman” is very welcome!

8-18 May — Nevertheless, She Persisted Exhibition (Edinburgh)

This exhibition of work by Edinburgh-based photographer Mhairi Bell-Moodie highlights the stories of 25 women. The women involved have overcome child loss, domestic abuse, rape, self harm, body dysmorphia, suicide attempts, breast cancer, chronic illness and much more. The series acknowledges their struggles and celebrates their survival.

The exhibition is free and open to all at Out of the Blue daily from 10 am-5 pm.

Please be aware that the work contains subject matters which some may find upsetting.

23 May — It’s Only Blood (London)

Journalist and author of It’s Only Blood Anna Dahlqvist is in conversation with Gabby Edline, activist and founder of Bloody Good Period. Attend this event to learn more about issues of gender inequality facing women and girls due to the lack of essential sanitary products and education, which are perpetuated by social and cultural shaming. In her book, Anna tells shocking and moving stories of why and how people from Sweden, Bangladesh, Uganda and the USA are fighting back against the shame.

9 May — CL X Sisterhood: Funky Living (Oxford)

A CL X Sisterhood Oxford collab? A funk night platforming incredible female and non binary DJs? An opportunity to support feminist independent publishing while dancing? Summer vibe graphics?

Cuntry Living Zine is teaming up with Sisterhood Funk Band to bring you the night of your dreams. There will be tunes, moves and plenty of sweat. So get on down to The Cellar & funk up your life.

12 May — Pregnant Then Screwed (Manchester)

This “festival of motherhood and work” is aimed at women who have felt pushed out of their careers after having children, as well as those who are thinking about motherhood and want to be armed with some invaluable insights.
Sessions cover topics from flexi-working to knowing your legal rights (in case your boss doesn’t). Expect to learn from the funniest and most successful mums around.

14 May — Panel: Women and Climate Change (Oxford)

Climate change is a feminist issue. Women are disproportionately vulnerable to the environmental crises we face. This panel presents women working on the frontline of resistance. Judy Ling Wong OBE, ambassador for the Women’s environmental Network and founder of the Black Environmental Network, and Lisa Schipper, researcher at the Overseas Development Institute, will draw on their experiences in the field to address the crucial link between women and climate change.

19 May — Feminism & Tech: Feminist AI? (London)

The Feminist Library will be hosting an event on the place of feminism in tech! This time round they’ll be talking AI from a feminist perspective —they’ll be asking questions like: what does feminist AI look like? Is it possible to have feminist AI? They’ll be opening the evening with a couple of films on the topic and then welcoming speakers from academia, activism and filmmaking, with a range of perspectives on feminism and AI. The panel will include inspiring women from Commons Co-Creation Platform, Code Liberation Front / Goldsmith’s University London, Ada-AI and the Feminist Library.

They are inviting you to join the discussions, watch feminism & AI films with us and hear feminists who work in this area shine a light on it from a range of perspectives. It will be a relaxed evening of interesting screenings and discussions, with drinks and snacks available to make your evening even more enjoyable.

27 May — The Empower Project AGM (Edinburgh)

The Empower Project are having their first ever AGM and there’s going to be pizza! Get your ticket for a zine making workshop to make their annual report, speakers & food.

The Empower Project is an NGO based in Scotland working on creative ways to tackle gender-based violence and online abuse. This year they have already co-hosted a decoding event with Amnesty International to take down #ToxicTwitter and held discussion groups and training sessions and put on a feminist disco! The best part is you can be a member for just £1! “Come for the pizza! Stay for the smashing of the patriarchy!”

28 May — Menstrual Hygiene Day

Menstrual Hygiene Day is “a global platform that brings together non-profits, government agencies, the private sector, the media and individuals to promote Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM)”. At The Circle we’re focussing on #MenstruationMatters throughout May. The Music Circle are planning a Night Walk through London to raise awareness about Menstruation Matters and raise funds to support young women and girls who do not have access to sanitary products or reproductive health education. If you would like to sponsor them, please click here.

1 June — The Guilty Feminist (London)

Join comedian Deborah Frances-White for her comedy podcast, recorded in front of a live audience.
In each episode Deborah and her guests discuss their noble goals as 21st century feminists and the paradoxes and insecurities which undermine them. The podcast has been a huge success with over 10,000,000 downloads since it started at the beginning of last year.

2-3 June — Artists & Activists: Second Wave Feminist Filmmakers (London)

The Women’s Movement of the 1970s empowered women to step behind the camera in larger numbers. Their pioneering work platformed voices, stories and issues previously ignored or misrepresented.

The ground-breaking directors highlighted in this series made films outside the mainstream industry, frequently through activist film cooperatives and collectives. Their work was screened in “consciousness-raising” groups, at political conventions and in other alternative venues, and was often intended to spark discussion and action on women’s issues.

These films offered alternate visions to the mainstream, introducing subjects of interest to women and reshaping how films were made in ways that continue to be influential. Through cinema vérité, animation, experimentation and autobiographical techniques, such as images from dreams and entries from diaries, a new cinematic language was forged to capture a shared experience.

10 June — PROCESSIONS (Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London)

The Suffrage movement was the start for many positive changes for women in the 20th Century. Now in 2018 we commemorate the past as we continue to advocate for change. Members of The Circle are committed to amplifying the voices for the most marginalised women and girls to ensure they are empowered by lasting change in the global movement for gender equality. On 10 June PROCESSIONS will be taking place in Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London.

PROCESSIONS is a celebratory mass participation artwork to commemorate the centenary of the women’s right to vote in the UK.

Some members of The Circle will be attending the event. Email us at hello@thecircle.ngo if you would like to join them.

29 June — Hotline @ Nice N Sleazy (Glasgow)

Hotline, Edinburgh’s resident female and non-binary DJ night, is moving to Glasgow! Hotline creates safe and inclusive spaces for LGBTQ+ people and will continual to do so in Glasgow. Great tunes and great people!

Until 31 August — At Last! Votes for Women! (London)

This exhibition at LSE features archive items and objects from the Women’s Library collection —including banners, sashes, badges and much more— to show the campaign methods of the three main groups for women’s suffrage: the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) and the Women’s Freedom League (WFL). It concentrates on the last (and often bitter) years of the long campaign of the struggle for women’s right to vote from 1908 to 1914, with the inclusion of prison diaries and leaflets detailing tactics, such as “rushing” the House of Commons.

 

 

 

 

Written by @AnnaRenfrew. Anna is a student at The University of Edinburgh and a volunteer at The Circle.


Events to attend in April to learn about the inequality issues The Circle is addressing

Photo credit: Judit Prieto | The Circle members at March 4 Women, London.

Inspired by the Feminist Calendars written by our fantastic volunteers, we wanted to put some additional external events for April onto your agenda. Events are a great way to meet other members and learn more about some of the issues we are addressing in our projects. If you are planning to attend any of these listed below, please email us at hello@thecircle.ngo so we can connect you with other members who are also interested in attending.

17 April — Walk Together to Fight Inequality, London

Issue: Inequality
Join The Elders, the Fight Inequality Alliance and the Atlantic Fellows for an event at LSE, London. The event is in honour of grassroot efforts around the world to address the inequality crisis and learn more about joining the #WalkTogether movement.

The Elders are an independent group of global leaders working together for peace and human rights. It was set up in 2007 by Nelson Mandela, Graça Machel and Desmond Tutu.

The Circle is committed to a guaranteeing a living wage for garment workers in the fast fashion supply chains. With Fashion Revolution Week taking place from 23-29 April, it’s the best time to brush up on your knowledge of The Circle’s Living Wage Project. Being informed about the fast fashion industry allows understanding of the greater context in which financial inequality for women and girls is perpetuated within fast fashion supply chains.

Here are some events being run by fellow members to help you be better informed:

22 April — We-Resonate Launch Event, London

We-Resonate is an ethical fashion brand founded by one of our inspiring members, Lizzie Clark, that will be launching on World Earth Day, 22 April, from 4 pm-8 pm.

28 April — How to Dress Ethically: CHANGE is SIMPLE and we’ll show you how, Online webinar

Another incredible member of The Circle and Founder of Enchanted Rebels, Lianne Bell, will be hosting and co-hosting a series of live events on Facebook, including Dress Ethically. She will be joined by ONE SAVVY MOTHER for a live Facebook event that aims to bring you closer to the people who make your clothes. They’ll be sharing their own experiences and answering your questions!

28 April — What the Hell is Greenwashing? Online webinar

The Circle member Lianne Bell will be having a good old chinwag with Ethical Fashion Blogger Tolly Dolly Posh about greenwashing. Lianne is based in Taiwan, but the chat will be taking place online at 15:30 UK time.

Written by Peta Barrett.

Peta is a member of The Circle since 2016 and The Circle Relationship Manager since 2017.


Inspiration Is in the Everyday Woman

Photo credit: Nader Elgadi | Members of The Circle at the Annual Gathering 2017

As a woman, I feel we are always encouraged to name our “inspirational woman”. We are surrounded by the media plugging the likes of Emma Watson, Beyoncé and Jessica Ennis-Hill, who have all made their mark in society regardless of their gender. I am not disputing this. These women are amazing, have amazing talents and have achieved amazing things. Unfortunately, what I think is sometimes forgotten is that we are not all aiming to be the best actress, musician, sports person or a world leader — we are aiming to be the best version of ourselves that we can be.

With this in mind, why are we constantly looking at the “stars” for inspiration and guidance? Why are we looking at Cosmopolitan’s “Woman of the Year” awards, or Sport England’s “This girl can” campaign to drive us forward? Personally, I feel we need to be looking closer to home more often. As cliché as it may be, my mum is one of my biggest inspirations, as I’m sure yours is to you. Running her own business, being a single parent and dealing with all the fun that goes into looking after two mood-forever-changing children is clearly very admirable.

But it is not just my mum that inspires me. I take inspiration from my friends, the ones who spend every day in the library slaving away for their degree, but still are able to hold down a part time job and enjoy a good night out. I take inspiration from the ones who are still smiling and laughing when they have broken up with a boyfriend; the ones who no matter what time of the day will always be there with a cup of tea/bottle of wine when you need it the most and the ones who are strong enough to say “no” to things they do not want to do. I take inspiration from my aunts who have had the courage to travel the world and constantly experience new things and I take inspiration from my nana who can barely walk but still has one of the most active, creative minds I know, and my grandma who at nearly 80 has just come back from Australia!

I don’t believe we should just have one role model. I personally don’t believe that me trying to be Beyoncé is the most realistic thing either (although after a few glasses of wine I think my rendition of “Single Ladies” is pretty much on par with hers, to be honest). But what I do believe is that we can do anything we put our mind to, whether male, female or nonbinary, and it is the people who surround you, your family, your friends, teachers, colleagues, lecturers (the list is endless), who make you believe that you can too.

I guess what I’m trying to say is, it’s not Beyoncé, Emma Watson or Jessica Ennis-Hill who inspire me to try and be like them, but the women around me who inspire me to believe that I can. Let’s face it, it’s 2018 and we are still fighting for feminism to be heard. Women in this country are still being paid less than men for the same jobs; the least we can do is look around us. Look around and remember that we all have something to offer; to someone we are their inspiration. So be the best possible you, not just for yourself but for the people around you, because someone is looking up to you —maybe it’s me, maybe it’s your friend, your sister, your mum, your boss, that girl who always sits four spaces away from you in the library— whoever it is and whoever you are, we all deserve to inspire and to be inspired. Inspiration is a beautiful, amazing thing which leads on to even more beautiful and amazing things— and who wouldn’t want to be a part of that?

To my family I am still a girl, to my work colleagues I am woman, and to society I am female, but to me I am Hatti and I hope I am simply Hatti to you too. Each one of these labels has a different connotation, which of course you don’t need me to explain, but thanks to the women around me I hope to be the best Hatti I could ever possibly be.

At The Circle we’re inspired by our members and volunteers every day. If you would like to find out more about our membership and how you can become a member, go to our Become a Member page.

 

 

 

 

 

Written by Hatti Briggs, a volunteer of The Circle since 2016. You can read more articles by Hatti in her blog.