Global Feminist Calendar May and June 2019

Image credit: Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image

13th April – 1st June – Women’s Words Exhibition (Glasgow)

This spring Glasgow Women’s Library are opening the door to women’s writing in their collections. From song lyrics and scribbles to plays and pulp fiction, you will have access to a plethora of women’s words in this fantastic exhibition.

8 May – To Exist is To Resist: Black Feminism in Europe (Edinburgh)

Motherhood and the home, friendships and intimate relationships, activism and community, literature, dance and film: These are spaces in which To Exist isTo Resist imagines a Black feminist Europe.

Akwugo Emejulu and Francesca Sobande’s have edited a brilliant collection bringing together activists, artists and scholars of colour to show how Black feminism and Afrofeminism are being practiced in Europe today.

They explore how women of colour across Europe are undertaking creative resistances to institutionalised inequalities, imagining radical new futures outside and against the neo-colonial frames and practices of contemporary Europe.

10 May – Not Bad for A Girl X Indigo: Girls Girls Girls (Manchester)

Not Bad For A Girl and Indigo Withington are teaming up to bring you the ultimate ladies night, where 100% of the designers, DJs, bar staff and security are women.

Not Bad For A Girl is a home-grown ethically-sourced collective of women who just want to have fun. Born from a shared love of music/events and hatred of gender inequality, they are a night out with the mission of equal opportunity, equal pay and equal parts spirit and mixer.

10 May – Herstories Festival (Manchester)

Get your ticket now to the forthcoming Herstories Festival, which will take place from Friday 10th to Sunday 12th May 2019 here at Stretford Public Hall.

The weekend-long festival of cultural activity will feature film screenings, workshops and a range of arts, all celebrating the history of women and social change in Manchester. Generously funded by Film Hub North and delivered in partnership with the North West Film Archive (NWFA), MACFEST, the Muslim Arts and Culture Festival, and the Stretford Arts Collective (SAC32).

11 May – #SheInspiresMe Car Boot Sale 2019 (London)

Women for Women International are hosting a one of a kind fashion extravaganza to support women survivors of war. Join top designers, style influencers and celebrities for an afternoon of eco-friendly, guilt-free shopping for a great cause. Numbers are limited – book early to secure your entry to the chicest car boot sale ever! Book your ticket now!

14 May – Laura Mulvey In Conversation: Feminist Film Curating (London)

This conversation will focus on the intervention and activism of feminist film curators seeking to challenge and rethink the canon, from a feminist and later queer feminist perspective, starting with some of Laura Mulvey’s interventions in this area back in the 1970s, and bringing the debate up to date via the work of B. Ruby Rich and contemporary initiatives such as Club des Femmes.

Participants: Laura Mulvey (Birkbeck), Clarissa Jacob (Royal Holloway), Janet McCabe (Birkbeck)

21 May – Staying with the Violence: Womb, Work and Family Abolition (London)

Full Surrogacy Now brings a unique perspective to debates around assisted reproduction, stemming from Lewis’ contention that all reproduction is assisted. Arguing for solidarity between paid and unpaid gestators, Lewis suggests that the struggles of workers in the surrogacy industry may help illuminate the path towards alternative family arrangements based on transgenerational caring relationships (or, ‘family abolition’, as it has been referred to by some utopian socialists and queer feminists). Interviewing paid surrogates alongside other gestational workers, Lewis breaks down our assumptions that children necessarily belong to those whose genetics they share, calling for the radical transformation of kinship and the institution of the family.

28 May – It’s Time for Action – A Celebration of Menstrual Hygiene (Sheffield)

For Menstrual Hygiene Day, Irise International are holding an event that will bring together charity workers, researchers, activists and supporters in South Yorkshire to share how we are taking action to create a world where no one is held back by their period.

This event is open to the public, so please come and join us to learn more about why menstruation matters and how you can take action.

Please email info@irise.org.uk if you would like to have a stall or to share your work or experiences.

29 May – Readers of Colour: GWL Women of Colour Bookgroup (Edinburgh)

Led by poet, writer and activist Nadine Aisha Jassat, the group meets in the bookshop on the last Wednesday of every month to discuss poetry, fiction, graphic novels, essays and narrative non-fiction by women writers of colour, with work by Scotland’s own makar Jackie Kay as well as writers from around the world including Fatimah Asghar.

Attendance is free, and the reading group is a great opportunity to meet new people, exchange and share conversations and ideas, and share passion for writing by women of colour.

30 May – Menstruation Matters (London)

The Music Circle and Circle members with a shared professional connection in healthcare are proud to be hosting an event in support of The Circle’s partner project – Irise International. This is an exciting opportunity to hear from Irise International’s Co-Founder Emily Wilson. We will also be screening the Oscar-winning documentary Period.End of Sentence to educate and inform our guests on the importance of access to knowledge and essential sanitary products in the global movement for gender equality.

Over the course of the evening, there will be the opportunity to find out a little bit more about the work that Irise does in both the UK and Uganda.

5 June – Under the Wire (London)

A powerful account of legendary Sunday Times war correspondent Marie Colvin and photographer Paul Conroy’s mission to Homs, Syria in February 2012. Their assignment was to cover the plight of trapped Syrian civilians under siege by their own government. Tragically, Colvin was killed when the international media centre was hit by Syrian Army artillery fire; despite being critically injured, Conroy had to a find way to make it out alive.

He is determined to continue telling the stories of the people he met during this assignment and their desperate situation caught in the middle of a conflict zone.

8 June – Let’s Talk About Contraception (London)

Doesn’t sound like your type of fun? Then you’re wrong.

This is a time to come together and celebrate the creation of Contraception Zine, but more importantly, to continue what we’ve started here. The event is aimed at bringing to light some more of the experiences and challenges folks have faced in dealing with, notably, female contraceptives – looking at the effects on body and mind that you weren’t necessarily warned about. Whether you’ve contributed, wanted to or you’re just curious as to how we will make this fun, then please come along!

There will be crafts, poetry, pictures, music and nearly definitely a pill themed cake.

If you have anything you would like to show and tell then please get in touch, there will be a gallery space and room to perform/project (contraceptionzine@gmail.com).

21 June – NUS Women’s Campaign X Abortion Support Network Fundraiser (London)

NUS Women’s Campaign host a night of music, poetry, readings, and short films at SOAS Students’ Union JCR in support of Abortion Support Network.

Abortion Support Network are a volunteer-led organisation providing accommodation and financial assistance to women forced to travel from Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man to access an abortion.

29 June – Feminist Anarchist Bookfair 2019 (Edinburgh)

This will be the second annual Edinburgh Anarchist Feminist Bookfair.  Bringing together talks, workshops and stalls from publishers and groups to educate and share. Don’t miss out on the opportunity for some anarchic reading for your Summer holiday!

There will be a free licensed crèche and talks and workshops throughout the day. Contributors and a timetable will be released closer to the event.

#GlobalFeminism #WomenEmpoweringWomen


How I’ll Be a Better Feminist in 2019

Photo Credit: She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry, 2014.

This month we are opening up our blog to our members. Rosie writes about her feminist New Year’s resolutions for the coming year!

Read more

I think that reading about feminism is the best way to become a better Global Feminist. It allows you to understand the viewpoints of other women from around the world and is also a great way to keep up to date on current discussions surrounding contemporary women’s rights. On my reading list for this year are ‘Feminists Don’t Wear Pink and Other Lies’ by Scarlett Curtis, ‘Why We Should All Be Feminists’ by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie‎, ‘I am Malala’ Malala Yousafzai and ‘Eve Was Shamed’ by Helena Kennedy. I think that is an important gateway into the experiences of women from different cultures and backgrounds to my own. I believe that these different perspectives further encourage me to become a truly Global Feminist. These texts are written by women who write from a number of different viewpoints, either having experienced different modes sexism or misogyny themselves, or their professions such as journalists have led them to discover the stories of women who may not have the platform to share their own experiences.

Ensure that my feminism is intersectional

All sexism and misogyny is deplorable and all women’s experiences matter. I recognize that my experience does not reflect the whole spectrum of oppression faced by women around the world and I want to be an ally for all women. For those experiencing forced marriage or FGM, for the women that have been trafficked for sex or have been failed by the law after suffering rape or sexual assault, those who are unable to access a safe and legal abortion, and others who have to give birth in dangerous conditions. It is for these women that I vow to support. Global Feminism is about all women coming together and sharing cultures and experience, it encourages us to understand inequalities and oppression on a global scale.

Put my money where my mouth is

I love clothes and I love fashion, but I also plan to find out more about the inequalities rife within the garment sector. I know that 80% of garment workers are women and that they often work in unsafe conditions for long hours with little pay and fewer labour laws. This also puts them at risk of sexual harassment from their bosses and in a lot of instances maternity leave is limited to non-existent. This year, I really want to make sure as many of my clothes as possible are made in an ethical way, even if this means buying less. I will commit to learning more about sweatshop free brands to make sure my purchasing decisions don’t enslave the women making my clothes.

Educate friends and family

This year, I want to educate my friends and family about Global Feminism at every chance I get. I find that many men don’t engage in feminism and are not always aware of their privilege. This mindset also applies to women who are purely interested in Western feminism, to those who will happily wear a ‘Girl Power’ shirt without considering the plight of the woman who made it. Taking the opportunity to talk to these men and women in your life is an opportunity to communicate the values Global Feminism and some of the shocking statistics that quantify the level of inequality across the globe. Speaking to friends and family is also a good way of communicating an accurate definition of feminism and what that entails. I know men who admit that they were hesitant to support the feminist cause because they believed that the movement was rooted in a hatred of men. This year I want to spread the word by inviting my friends to watch feminist films, lending them books and recommending podcasts.

Empower other women

Every day I want to try and take little actions that help other women. This means that I won’t wait until the next big protest or social media hashtag to assert my feminism, but I will support women at every chance I get. I resolve to make space for my female colleagues to speak in work meetings, to back up their ideas and to make sure they get the credit. I will help women who are being harassed in a bar or on the street and call out sexist comments. I already call out everyday sexism in my social circle, but 2019 will be the year that I take this further – to work, to the street and online.

Network with like-minded women

In 2019, I want to connect more with other global feminists. I have a bit of a fear of networking situations, so I also want to take every opportunity to get out of my comfort zone. I also believe that I could learn a lot from the perspectives of others, which in turn will make me a better feminist. Types of networking I would love to take part in includes charity events, social media, feminist book clubs and debates. I would also like to volunteer with charities that support women globally so I can learn more about how I can help other women.

Be kinder to all my sisters

The world is harsh enough on women already so we should all be making the effort to empower each other. We need to support one another to make real change. We don’t need to be complicit in unrealistic beauty standards by judging each other on what we wear or how much we weigh. Nor should we be shaming other women for their sexuality, career or lifestyle choices. Stick up for your sisters in 2019!

This article was written by Rosie Greenfield, member of The Circle.

#WomenEmpoweringWomen #WidenYourCircle #OneReasonWhyImAGlobalFeminist


Feminist Calendar: November and December

Photo credit: She’s Beautiful when She’s Angry, 2014.

Looking to be inspired in the run-up to Christmas? The Circle volunteer Jessi Wells has got it covered with this bi-monthly roundup of feminist events

5 November — TEDxUCLWomen 2017 (London)

TEDxUCLWomen is a movement celebrating women’s achievements and critiquing barriers to further change. This year’s theme is Home, encompassing notions of community, belonging, race, class, familiarity and discomfort. An incredible line-up of speakers will challenge participants’ perceptions and enrich their thinking around the theme.

9 November — The Space Between Us: Female poets on time, place and identity (Oxford)

At this event, curated by Poet in the City, contemporary female poets will draw on the past to explore their own modern identities and sense of belonging. Inspired by the venue — St Hugh’s College, whose first principal felt she slipped back in time when visiting Versailles — Victoria Adukwei Bulley and Patience Agbabi will explore stories from across time and space, reflecting on their own work and that of the female poets who preceded them.

16 November — Sara Ahmed and Everyday Feminism (Manchester)

Sara Ahmed’s celebrated new book, Living a Feminist Life, reveals how feminist theory is generated from ordinary experiences at home and at work — from everyday feminism. On 16 November, Ahmed will be in conversation with host Muzna Rahman. She will read and discuss extracts of her work, with a focus on intersectionality and queer and race studies; this will be followed by an audience Q&A and a drinks reception.

18 November — Feminist Futures Conference (London)

The Fawcett Society is the UK’s leading charity promoting gender equality and women’s rights. Join them on 18 November for their annual conference, a day of networking, panel discussions and interactive workshops. Hear from inspiring feminists including broadcaster June Sarpong and feminist writer Caroline Criado-Perez.

24 November — Amazons and Women Warriors: visual talk by Max Dashú (London)

This live visual presentation at The Feminist Library will illuminate the hidden realities of women warriors. From the Qyrk Qyz (Forty Maidens) of Central Asia to the female general Trung Trac in Vietnam, historian Max Dashú will place the women of Amazon legend into historical global perspective.

25 November — Chai Day (nationwide)

25 November is the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Events will be taking place around the world raise to awareness of the issue: globally, 1 in 3 women experience violence in their lifetime, and in some countries this rises to 7 in 10. The Circle will be playing its part by hosting Chai Day, a chance for friends and colleagues to get together over a cup of tea, to discuss and raise funds for a good cause.

1 December — Peggy Seeger ‘First Time Ever’ UK Concert Tour (Wigan)

American folksinger Peggy Seeger is a feminist icon, “an activist, an advocate, a mover-and-shaker”. At the age of 82, she’s taking to the road this winter to promote her recently published memoir and accompanying CD. She’ll be performing hits from a career spanning six decades, interspersing her songs with readings from her book. It will be an unforgettable night!

6 December — Community Film Festival, Swindon Feminist Network (Swindon)

Over the past year, as part of the Swindon200 project, community groups and charities have been working together to produce a series of short films on the topic of equality and inclusion. The films will be screened for the first time at the Community Film Festival, which will run from 14 November to 12 December. Come along on 6 December to watch the Swindon Feminist Network’s new film, and to find out more about the issues that affect women.

10-16 Deceber — FiLiArt: Refuge (London)

FiLiArt’s theme this year is refuge, both literal and metaphorical: they will be working with at-risk women and girls, and creating a safe haven through art. Visit their exhibition at Oxford House to see creations by thirty women artists working in all different media, from sculpture to photography and everything in between.