Widen Your Circle: with The Circle ally Brett

“Besides the incredible women who were my role models throughout my life, I was also inspired by my favourite singer, Annie Lennox, and her passion for equal rights and gender equality.”

At The Circle, we are of the strong belief that the fight for gender equality has to be inclusive. To reach it, men can and must stand next to us as allies to the Global Feminist movement. Brett is one of our male allies and supports our work in a number of ways. As part of #WidenYourCircle, we wanted to catch up with him to discuss what it means to be an ally of The Circle.

Tell us a bit about yourself:

I grew up in a small town in New Hampshire surrounded by two strong and fearless female role models, my mother and my older sister, Karen. Another woman who had a huge impact on my life was my Aunt Elizabeth, who could toss together an amazing dandelion greens salad and lived by her own rules until she was well past 100! As a school teacher for over 50 years, Elizabeth was adamant about the importance of educating girls all over the world. In addition to teaching me about global feminism at an early age, she introduced me to the visual arts which has lead me to my career as a designer today. One of the most meaningful things Elizabeth taught me is that with the right tools, I can make change happen for myself and others. A perspective that has led me to this great organisation.

Why did you decide to become an ally of The Circle?

Besides the incredible women who were my role models throughout my life, I was also inspired by my favourite singer, Annie Lennox, and her passion for equal rights and gender equality. It was through Annie’s social media posts that I first learned about The Circle and their fight for marginalised women. After winning tickets to an Annie Lennox concert and being lucky enough to meet her in person, I knew that I wanted to become a part of this cause. Just as she is, I’m passionate about the organisation’s legal assistance and education efforts and want to help this worthy cause in any way I can.

How have you used your professional skills or knowledge as an ally of The Circle?

I’ve been in the world of graphic design for 30 years.  In an effort to increase visibility for the Circle, I use my creative skills to assist with web and book design, posters, and really whatever graphic design work they need. You may have seen my creativity on display with The Circle’s e-vites and Christmas cards. Contributing my work and expertise to a greater cause is very meaningful to me. And I think it would be to my Aunt Elizabeth as well.

Find out more about the different ways you can become an ally of The Circle by clicking here.


The Circle calls for the Bangladesh Accord on Fire and Safety to remain

 

The horrific tragedy in 2013 at the Rana Plaza in Bangladesh and the needless death of 1.134 brought to the world’s attention the dangerous and oppressive working conditions that millions of women working in the fast fashion industry face every day.

Out of that awfulness some progress has come in the form of the introduction of the Bangladesh Accord on Fire and Safety that over the last five years has inspected and worked with hundreds of factories to improve the working conditions for thousands of workers.

We are therefore disheartened to read that the Bangladesh Government now wish to shut down the Accord and instead use their own regulatory body, the Remediation Co-ordination Cell which is still in its infancy in terms of development.

The Circle is working to ensure that women in the ready-made garment earn a living wage.

Currently in countries who are the largest producers of fast fashion workers are not receiving a living wage at all. In fact, in Bangladesh workers receive a minimum wage that is only 9% of a living wage. Whilst we continue our work and campaign on this issue we stand firm on ensuring that other basic human rights such as a right to life are realised.

Sioned Jones, Executive Director of The Circle stated ‘We must not allow any step back in the pushing forward to ensure the protection of workers fundamental human rights. Whilst there is still so much to be done to ensure all work in a safe manner and earn a living wage we were beginning to see progress in Bangladesh in terms of safety. The work of the Accord and their transparent and professional approach to improving working conditions on many factories in Bangladesh must be continued for the foreseeable future.’

Jessica Simor QC, Member of The Circle and the lead author of its report ‘A Living Wage is a Fundamental Right’ added ‘The human rights of the millions of women working in the Ready-Made Garment Industry must be protected. Working in safe and legal conditions are imperative to this and continuing the work of the independent Accord alongside factory owners and governments is essential.’

To find out more about our Living Wage projects click here

#OneReasonWhyImAGlobalFeminist #WomenEmpoweringWomen


Annie Lennox on CBS The Talk

Photo credit: Johnny Vy/CBS ©2017 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

 

The Circle Founder Annie Lennox was on The Talk, on CBS, on Tuesday 7 November, to talk about her career and activism.

Annie talked about who inspired her as a young musician, being a mother and being described as a “gender bender” in the eighties. She also explained how she found her passion for women’s rights, and how seeing the devastation that HIV/AIDS has caused in Sub-Saharan Africa motivated her to become an activist.

About The Circle, Annie said “14 million girls around the world are not getting an education. One in three women around the world are exposed to gender-based violence, violence and abuse… There are huge things going on with women around the globe. This is why I call it ‘global feminism’ and this is why I founded The Circle, to inspire women”.

If you would also like to support women and girls around the world, click here to donate or become a member of The Circle.