Menstruation Matters

 

Menstruation matters, especially to the millions of girls being held back by their periods. Some studies show that in some parts of Uganda, 74% of girls believe that period pain is a sign of illness, 50% of girls avoid school because of their period and 43% believe that it is harmful to run or dance during their period.

The Music Circle is raising funds to support Irise International. With a donation from The Music Circle, Irise will be able to educate 2,000 girls about their menstrual and reproductive health and to make a wide range of sanitary products available in their communities, so that every girl has a choice. Help us reach our goal and donate by clicking here.


 
 

Here is what you can do to help…

Raise awareness

On 28 May, Menstrual Hygiene Day, make some noise on social media. Read up on why menstruation matters, be informed, tweet and post.

You can use some of the following Menstrual Hygiene Day signs. Personalise them, print them out, take a selfie with your sign and post it on social media. Don’t forget to tag us and use the hashtags #MenstruationMatters and #NoMoreLimits.


The Circle Member Ann-Marie O’ Connor reflects on #March4Women

Photo credit: Judit Prieto | #March4Women 2018, London.

On 4 March 2018, several members of The Circle attended the #March4Women rally in London with their friends and family. Ann-Marie O’Connor is one of those members. She has written about why she marched and why she will continue to support feminist causes in the future.

In this historic year that marks the 100th anniversary since some women got the right to vote, it could not be a better time to mobilise the surge of feminist energy currently being displayed throughout the world. History certainly appears to be repeating itself with the involvement of Helen Pankhurst, great-grand daughter of Emmeline, who also marched for women with us on 4 March 2018. I was reminded through her various media interviews that the struggle was never just about getting the vote. In an interview before her appearance at the Women of the World Festival 2018 at London’s Southbank Centre, she said “it was about individual women saying enough is enough, and there’s more that I want to do with my life, and I feel that my daughters should be able to do more with their lives” (Global Citizen, 7/3/2018).

Yes, my sentiments exactly and one of the reasons I wanted to take my own daughter with me to the march. But another reason for me was creating for her an understanding of the importance of taking the baton from one generation and passing it to the next. In these turbulent times we live, rights that have previously been won and fought for cannot be taken for granted and still need to be maintained. Women’s rights are still the fight of our generation. Keeping up the strength and resolve that is needed for current struggles is a legacy that hopefully we can, by our own participation, pass on to future generations of women, so that they can empower themselves for future struggles.

The Circle gave me the ideal opportunity to march alongside other members whilst also hearing speeches from many inspirational women. Especially heartening was having the march endorsed by Mayor Sadiq Khan, espousing the message that London should be a beacon for gender equality. In fact, it was wonderful to see so many men of all ages marching also. As I have a son as well, I do feel a responsibility to educate him about gender equality, particularly with regard to the area of relationships and respect towards women. As he also deserves to be treated with equal respect, I hold on to the hope that this reciprocity should lay the foundation for all future healthy relationships. Now that his sister has experienced her first march and had fun, I’m hoping he will join us next year!


Young Global Feminists at #March4Women

Photo credit: Judit Prieto.

On Sunday the 4th March, by the houses of Parliament, the air was cold, but the atmosphere was warm, filled with minds and hearts of people from all over — all protesting against the same thing. We were fighting against the abuse and discrimination and political imbalance against women. Above waves of people, flew colourful, hand-drawn and humorous posters in all shapes and sizes. A multitude of different people — men, women, teens, children, introverts — came out to raise awareness about the issue that affects many, daily. It was rainy, but we persisted with our heads high and hearts in our voices and hands. The march ended after drumming and chanting in Trafalgar Square: the place where the whole movement really started. Speeches were said and songs were sung and, most importantly, we gained attention. We gained attention politically and through the media to show everyone how we still need change. Yet again, it was a small step, but that small step felt good. It felt inspiring.

Written by Amelia and Emily, 14 years old. Amelia and Emily attended the #March4Women 2018 with their mum and other members of The Circle. They are the next generation of The Circle members and global feminists.

To find out more about our membership and how to sign up to become a member, click here.


Annie Lennox: an Evening of Music and Conversation

 

 

Annie Lennox: An evening of music and conversation, Sadler’s Wells, London, review: Her voice was the epitome of pure soul

Pop star turned soul diva turned international campaigner. In recent times we have seen Annie Lennox mostly in that last role, and so think of her as a highly serious, passionate and intense person.

The revelation of this evening was to discover that she is genuinely funny, warm, engaging and effortlessly charismatic.

The occasion was a fund-raiser for Lennox’s charity, The Circle, which aims to empower disempowered women across the globe. Interviewed by the broadcaster Jo Whiley, she went through her life and career, aided by screen projections of her right from a baby, through school, with parents and grandparents, outside the Aberdeen tenement building, with no bathroom, where she grew up, through to the years of fame and success…

Go to full article

 

Annie’s put a spell on me again… Blending women’s rights with pop nostalgia Annie Lennox gives a rare performance at London’s Sadler’s Wells

A gig by Annie Lennox now comes along less often than a change of government.

Her last full concert in Britain took place in the age of Gordon Brown. Back in the John Major era, in 1995, I wrote a profile of her and tagged along for an entire world tour, which amounted to two shows in New York and one in a Polish forest.

So this is an event: ‘an evening of music and conversation’ in aid of The Circle, the NGO Lennox founded to boost women’s rights around the world…

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The Circle Founder Annie Lennox on Notes on Being a Woman, i-D

at college, pop icon annie lennox was told to become a teacher

The former Eurythmics star, who has sold more than 80 million records worldwide, tells i-D about dropping out of college, the wisdom of ageing, and her women-focused charity The Circle in her Notes on Being a Woman.

It’s not easy to get an interview with Annie Lennox. A globally recognised pop legend, famous for massive hits like 1983’s Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This) with former band the Eurythmics — as well as her iconic, androgynous bright red buzzcut — Annie doesn’t often perform these days, and turns down most interview requests. Having moved away from making music, she is now an activist and campaigner for the rights of women and girls around the world, through her NGO The Circle

i-D caught up with Annie and she told us about leaving Aberdeen at 17 to apply for music college in London in 1971, and the bad career advice she was given before dropping out in her third year. From learning to drive in her 30s, to the heart-bursting love of motherhood, the wrinkle-loving wisdom of age, and the struggle of women around the world who cannot access education and healthcare, these are Annie’s Notes on Being a Woman…

Go to full article


Widen Your Circle: with The Circle Member Efe

“Her story has encouraged people like me to know that you’re not alone in this situation, and that’s what The Circle is all about”

Efe is a Biomedical Scientist and a member of The Circle. In her Widen Your Circle vlog, Efe explains why she is a member and tells us about one fellow member that has inspired her to continue working towards gender equality.

#WidenYourCircle

The Circle members are women from all walks of life who come together to support some of the most marginalised women and girls across the globe.

Click here to become a member of The Circle and Widen Your Circle.


Widen Your Circle: with The Circle Member Lianne

“They say that there is power in numbers and I think this is particularly true for us as women”

The second vlog in the Widen Your Circle campaign is by Lianne, a member of The Circle that is based in Taiwan.

Lianne is Co-Founder of the ethical fashion company Enchanted Rebels and a member of The Circle since 2017. Despite living on another continent, she is a very engaged member, and is supporting our Living Wage project remotely.

In the Widen Your Circle campaign, our members are taking over our blog, to tell us why they want to be part of The Circle and what they are doing to support women around the world.

Become a member to support women and girls around the world and Widen Your Circle.


Feminist Calendar: January and February 2018

11 January — Xenofeminism: A Politics for Alienation (London)

Hosted by the Centre for Gender Studies at SOAS, speakers Diann Bauer and Helen Hester will speak about their work on the critical school of Xenofeminism. Xenofeminism (XF) is a “gender abolitionist, anti-naturalist, technomaterialist form of posthumanism, initiated by the working group Laboria Cuboniks. It is a project aiming to infect a wide range of fields, operating on the assumption that any meaningful change will happen at a range of scales and across a range of disciplines”.

13 January — LSFF 2018: Radical Softness: Barbara Hammer and Chick Strand (London)

“My life changed through touching another woman whose body was similar to my own. My sense of touch became my connection to the screen. I wanted the screen to be felt by the audience in their own bodies.” — Barbara Hammer, “The Screen as the Body”, Mousse Magazine.

A combined screening of Chick Strand and Barbara Hammer, exploring the idea of ‘radical softness’ — the power in being both abrasively feminine and openly vulnerable, subverting emotion from weakness to strength through a radically soft camera and Hammer and Strand’s specifically haptic modes of filmmaking.

Accompanied by Skype Q&A with Hammer in conversation with Club des Femmes’ Selina Robertson.

14 January — Manchester Women’s Equality Party meeting (Manchester)

The next Manchester WE branch meeting will be held as usual at The Pankhurst Centre, 60-62 Nelson Street, Manchester M13 9WP from 2-4pm.

Go along to share ideas about possible local campaigns, such as their campaign to make abortion free, safe and legal in every part of the UK.

18 January — Utter: Raise Your Voice Glasgow (Glasgow)

Taking place at the Glasgow Women’s Library, this singing group brings together women of all ages and abilities to celebrate womanhood through the power of our collective voice.

“Each session uses music and movement to explore a particular aspect of our personality. Build your confidence as you experience the joy of making music.”

No auditions, no need to read music, and no singing experience necessary.

Raise Your Voice takes place every fortnight and you can drop by on weeks that you are available!

17 January — Women in Diplomacy (London)

Angela Kane will be talking about her experience in diplomacy and will reflect upon challenges and opportunities for women pursuing careers in diplomacy.

Ms Kane served as the United Nations High Representative for Disarmament Affairs until mid-2015, where she provided strategy, vision and thought leadership for the United Nations on its multilateral disarmament and non-proliferation agendas. She was responsible for planning, negotiating and conducting the ground-breaking investigation of alleged chemical weapons used in Syria in 2013, which resulted in Syria’s destruction of its chemical stocks. Previously, Ms Kane served as the Under-Secretary-General for Management, heading the largest and most complex UN department, with responsibility for the global financial and budgetary management of the UN (2008-2012). Ms Kane also served as UN Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs, focusing on the prevention and resolution of conflicts in all regions except Africa.

23 January — Women’s Rights Writing and Campaigning Meeting (Cambridge)

Join & help make a difference for women and girls in the UK and worldwide. At this meeting Amnesty International Cambridge City Group will write letters and solidarity cards, but also discuss and plan campaigning actions for example stalls or talks on subjects such as abortion rights and sexual harassment.

They will be writing letters on behalf of Teodora del Carmen Vásquez in El Salvador, who was sentenced to thirty years in prison for aggravated homicide in 2008 after suffering a stillbirth. She was presumed guilty of having an abortion rather than the potential victim of pregnancy complications. Teodora’s trial was flawed and lacking in due process.

They will also be campaigning for women’s human rights lawyer Azza Soliman. At the regional Amnesty conference on women’s rights in Cambridge, in February 2016, Azza Soliman gave the keynote speech, detailing her work and the rights’ abuses that women were failing. She is now facing 15 years in prison and the Egyptian authorities have also banned her from travelling and frozen her assets.

1 February — Feminist Book Club: Sister Outsider (Manchester)

If you’re looking to expand your knowledge of feminist literature, engage in discussions considering the usefulness of feminist criticism or just meet some like-minded people, then head down to Morley Cheek’s with your book in hand! Anyone is welcome to join in the discussion and new attendees are always welcome!

1 February — Our Red Aunt: Exhibition Launch (Glasgow)

Fiona Jack presents a collection of new works responding to the work and life of her Grand Aunt, prominent Scottish activist and suffragette Helen Crawfurd (née Jack).

In the Glasgow Women’s Library’s first solo exhibition by an international artist, Fiona Jack introduces a new series of works made in response to her Grand Aunt, suffragette Helen Crawfurd, which will be exhibited at the library less than a mile from where Crawfurd campaigned on Glasgow Green in the early 1900s. Over the past year, Fiona has studied Helen’s unrelenting crusade against injustice and, with friends and collaborators, she has made a series of books, banners, sculptures and ceramics that respond to Helen Crawfurd’s legacy and the relevance of her critical perspectives today.

The exhibition will continue until Saturday 17th March if you can’t make the opening!

5 February — Light Up the Night (London)

As part of Sexual Abuse and Sexual Violence Awareness Week, Light Up the Night will be meeting on the Millenium Bridge as a sign of solidarity with survivors of sexual abuse and sexual violence. In light of the incredible 2017 that witnessed what has been called a cultural shift in attitudes towards the issue, this is a great way to show your support and continue fighting these crimes in the new year.

6 February — The Oxford Circle Author Talk, with Sarah Morris

Sue Lloyd-Roberts was a multi award-winning BBC journalist who wrote The War on Women: And the Brave Ones Who Fight Back. She died of cancer before completing the book, the content of which was finalised by her daughter Sarah.

In The War on Women, Sue brings to life many stories she had come across working as a journalist over all the world of women who have suffered, witnessed and combated oppression, discrimination and violence such as female genital mutilation, honour killings in the UK and forced marriage. She fought with them and for them until the very end.

Sarah will be speaking about The War on Women and the challenges of finalising it ready for publication, and is very happy to answer questions about it.

All profits from this event will go towards The Oxford Circle, a network of members of The Circle that are based in Oxfordshire.

9 February — Powerful Women: A Hidden History, at the National Gallery (London)

“Did you know that of the 2,300 paintings on display at the National Gallery, only eleven are by women? Did you know that only around five per cent of the works in major permanent collections worldwide is by women artists? Did you know that on average less than five per cent of the artists in permanent collection’s modern art sections are women, but 85% of the nudes are female? Can you name the female heroes and seductresses of the old testament? Do you know their stories? Have you ever heard of a Maenad? Medusa? Madame Pompidour? Saint Catherine?”

London Drawing Group is addressing this imbalance: “POWERFUL WOMEN: a Hidden History invites you to step inside London’s Iconic National Gallery with a celebration of powerful female figures throughout history; from Grecian Goddesses to the wonderfully vicious Old Testament heroines, stories of Saints and Martyrs, Witches, Monsters and the too-long-forgotten female artists of the National Gallery”.

Let resident LDG tutor Luisa-Maria MacCormack guide you through the gallery and spend the afternoon practicing drawing exercises that are designed to help you understand and engage with these paintings and stories in new and creative ways.

19 February — The Guilty Feminist at Royal Albert Hall (London)

Ever felt like you should be better at feminism?

Join comedian Deborah Frances-White and a guest host for her comedy podcast, recorded in front of a live audience. Each episode Deborah and her guests discuss topics “all 21st century feminists agree on” while confessing their insecurities, hypocrisies and fears that underlie their lofty principles.

20 February — TEDxUniversityofEdinburgh Conference ‘Empowerment’ (Edinburgh)

TEDxUniversityofEdinburgh is back in 2018 with its yearly flagship conference. The aim of TEDxUoE is to bring together bright minds to give talks that are idea-focused and on a wide range of subjects, to foster learning, inspiration and wonder — and provoke conversations that matter.

Given the abundance of daunting news from many parts of the world we receive these days, it seems easy to fall trap to a sense of helplessness. TEDxUoE says it wants to fight this feeling of discouragement and that’s why this year the theme of the conference is “Empowerment”.

In this full-day conference, locally-sourced speakers will navigate diverse topics and explain why we can be hopeful about the future we share, and they will spread their ideas to empower us in our everyday personal life. Talks will cover various fields of knowledge from multilingualism to video games, from eating habits to breakthrough scientific discoveries achieved at Edinburgh University.

21 February — Celebrating the Marie Colvin Journalists Network (London)

Marie Colvin’s friends created the Marie Colvin Journalists Network with The Circle in 2015, as a tribute to her life and her contribution to journalism. The MCJN is a network of female journalists working in conflict zones in the Middle East and North Africa. It is a platform where younger or more isolated journalists can access mentoring from more experienced journalists, counselling, online resources and workshops, and access to a community where they can share experiences and seek advice in both English and Arabic.

On the 6th anniversary of Marie’s killing in Syria, The Marie Colvin Circle, along with her friends and colleagues, will celebrate her life and legacy and will raise funds to support the MCJN.

24 February — Germaine Greer: Women for Life on Earth (Manchester)

Sympathetic Development has invited Greer, who is regarded as one of the major voices of the second-wave feminist movement, to talk about the “inevitability of ecofeminism”.

When Welsh women turned up at the RAF base at Greenham Common in 1981, they were carrying a banner that read “Women for Life on Earth”. Theirs was direct action, born of gut reaction, virtually innocent of theoretical framework.

Feminists can be found wherever the planet and our fellow earthlings are in trouble. They shepherd stranded cetaceans back into deeper water, stand in front of lorries carrying live animals to slaughter, lash themselves to conveyor belts in protest against the logging of old-growth forests, march and lobby against the threat of fracking. The action they cannot be moved to take on their own behalf, they take on behalf of the planet. If the planet is to survive and human beings continue to inhabit it, this female energy must be unleashed.

28 February — Women In Tech Conference (Edinburgh)

Organised by Edinburgh University Women in STEM, the aim of this conference is to help breach the gender gap by creating a support network and introducing the software engineers of tomorrow to the role models of today. You will have the opportunity to participate in workshops led by inspiring women while learning new skills and connecting with like-minded people. This event will allow intermingling with professionals and peers as well as receiving career advice from successful women in the tech industry.


Singer Annie Lennox Calls for Solidarity to Help Most Vulnerable Women

The Circle featured in Thomson Reuters Foundation News

 

LONDON, June 13 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – The challenges women face in the developing world, such as poor education and healthcare, child marriage and female genital mutilation may seem insurmountable, but change can come through solidarity from women in rich nations, said singer Annie Lennox.

While the disadvantages of women in poor countries are not being addressed, women in rich countries could use their power for good, Lennox said.

“This is how I see feminism, about the empowerment of women,” she told the Fortune Most Powerful Women International Summit in London on Tuesday…

Go to the Thomson Reuters Foundation News website to read more.