Global Feminist Calendar March and April 2020

Photo: The Perfect Candidate

3-4 March – Because We Are Girls (Glasgow) 

Three sisters, Jeeti, Kira and Salakshana, have been fighting for more than eight years to finally gain some form of justice against a male cousin who abused them as children. For years they stayed silent for fear of blame and punishment. As the final verdict draws near, the sisters reflect on why they stayed quiet for so long. Deciding to focus more on the family dynamics that are prevalent in Punjabi culture rather than the grisly details of abuse, this is an important documentary that shines a light on the importance of support from the people that are closest to you. 

5 March – Women Behind Artivism (London)

Artivism – this is the concept of merging art & activism together. This coming March is very important for a number of reasons, but mainly as it is a month dedicated to celebrating women! Phaedra Peer X Brick Lane Gallery present ‘Women Behind Artivism’ an exhibition/event that will celebrate women that use their work to make bold statements. Panelists will explore the motivation behind their work, what makes them passionate about giving their work a pulse & the response they get to some of their more controversial pieces! Discussions will be centred around the importance of showcasing female bodies, sex in art & ‘art’powerment!

5-15 March – SheFest 2020 (Sheffield)

SheFest’s annual fringe festival is a 10-day event in Sheffield that “provides a female fronted addition to the region’s cultural calendar”. Aligning with International Women’s Day, the festival will include interactive activities, feminist film screenings, art, music, theatre, and feature panels and guest speakers.

It promises to be the biggest SheFest fringe in the festival’s history as the organisers collaborate with organisations across South Yorkshire, aiming to become the northern capital for International Women’s Day.

6-8 March – WOW Festival (London)

WOW is back in London this International Women’s Day for their tenth anniversary and to celebrate, the WOW Foundation presents their biggest and bravest festival yet. 

Over three days, WOW’s line-up of world-class speakers, activists and performers are joined by thousands to explore the state of gender equality across the globe and tackle the subjects that matter most to women and girls across the world today. 

We are honoured to have been invited to WOW once again. The Circle team will have an information stall on Sunday 8 March in the marketplace allowing those who have heard of us and those who know nothing about what we do to find out more about our projects and the issues they aim to tackle, including gender-based violence, the living wage and women in crises. We look forward to seeing our members, engaging with visitors of the WOW Market Place and making new friends! 

Photo: Beverley Knight at March4Women 2019

7 March – Never Going to Beat You Film Screening (London)

‘Never Going to Beat You’ threads together the varying and different stories of the 18 Gypsy and Traveller women, and it will raise awareness about domestic abuse within all communities.

The screening is followed by a panel discussion about domestic abuse, mental health and well-being within the Gypsy and Traveller communities.

8 March – March4Women (London)

CARE International’s #March4Women is a global movement for gender equality: it’s for anyone and everyone who wants to see a more equal world. Everyone is welcome. 

This year #March4Women will be celebrating the power and passion of women and girls who are on the frontline of responding to climate change. They are holding a pre-march event at the Women of the World festival: Emeli Sandé and RAYE will be performing alongside a star-studded line-up of musicians, actors, climate experts, youth activists and women directly impacted by the climate emergency.  

8 March – The Perfect Candidate (London)

In a small Saudi town, Maryam, an overworked doctor at an under-resourced clinic, impulsively decides to run for a seat on the municipal council. She faces endless hurdles as the town’s first female candidate: she can’t directly address groups of male voters, and isn’t supposed to show her face in her campaign video. Despite this, a determined Maryam’s popularity grows… This joyful and timely film offers much-needed optimism and hope for positive change. On International Women’s Day we’re pleased to celebrate this film and its director Haifaa Al-Mansour, herself a pioneering woman – her debut feature Wadjda made history as the first film shot entirely in Saudi Arabia, and the first made by a Saudi woman.  Followed by Q&A with director Haifaa Al-Mansour.

8 March – All the Queens Big Quiz (Glasgow)

Know your Pankhurst from your Pink, Miuccia from your Manson, Lamarr from your Ladytron and Austen from your Atwood? 

Join The Scottish Circle girl gang this International Women’s Day at BAaD in Glasgow for an unashamedly fun day celebrating the world’s most inspirational women. 

DJ Queen Hannah Currie of famed club night MILK will soundtrack the afternoon, playing out the greatest ever all-female anthems, whilst the formidable Quiz Mistress Queen Bev Lyons of The Showbiz Lion will host. Will you be crowned International Women’s Day Quiz Queen for 2020 and take the top prize? 

There will be fizz on arrival. There will be top chat. There will be bingo and a raffle with prizes galore. There may even be a crown! What’s more, proceeds from All the Queens Big Quiz will directly benefit our friends at Glasgow and Clyde Rape Crisis. 

8 March – Her Century at RBCFT (Dumfries) 

Glimpse into the work, home life and leisure of Scottish women during the twentieth century.
Scotland’s women lived through major social change in the twentieth century, challenging their roles in society and fighting for equality: at work and at home, classroom to croft, girlhood to motherhood. In this programme there are crofters, campaigners, factory workers, psychologists, mothers, pilots and educators. 
Discover their stories and hear their voices in ‘Her Century’, a timely collection of archive film curated by the National Library of Scotland and guaranteed to spark debate. These films are screened together for the first time in a touring program full of contemporary relevance.
Featuring work by professional documentarians such as Sarah Erulkar, Budge Cooper, Jenny Gilbertson and Jenny Brown as well as amateur footage from Grace Williamson.

Screening to celebrate International Women’s Day on 8 March. A post film discussion will be facilitated by artist and researcher Dr T S Beall. 

8 March – Pen Your Own Logo (Leeds) 

Front Bum in collaboration with FLF is inviting you to come and create your own bad ass wall slogan for International women’s day. 

You will be loaded with good quality gsm paper and lots of exciting materials to create your perfect mantra with plenty of that Front Bum creative guidance to keep you feeling inspired. There will also be a selection of frames to buy on the day so you can immediately hang up your creation with pride. 

8 March – International Women’s Day Festival (Birmingham)

Join the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire as they reflect on and celebrate diversity in the music industry.

Exciting and thought-provoking events will include; live performances from RBC students alongside guest musicians, visual and sound installations, yoga and mindfulness classes, networking, female-led practical workshops, and panel discussions.

9 March – The Oxford Circle X Oxford Women International (Oxford)

OxWomIn and LMH FemSoc have invited The Oxford Circle to speak to students about Global Feminism! Leanne, Chair of The Oxford Circle is excited to be attending and will shed some light on what it means to be a member of The Circle.

10 March – The Goddess Space (London)

Chair of The Healthcare Circle, Alice Sinclair is teaming up with Anoushka Florence of The Goddess Space for an evening of goddess vibes for a good cause. Anoushka will be creating a sacred space in the beautiful Boca Cha Cha in Little Venice. You will be invited to step into this space as Anoushka guides you through the power of a women’s circle. This will be a journey of meditation, sharing, intention setting and ritual that will leave you feeling empowered, inspired and connected. 

For those who are not familiar with this practice, rest assured that this a safe and secure space that aims to leave you grounded, with a sense of purpose moving forward. Held at the beautiful Boca Cha Cha, tickets are £30. 

10-14 March – Sabrina Mahfouz: Lilith & Karaokay (London)

This lyrical play draws on the Jewish mythological figure of Lilith, Adam’s first wife, who refused to take the subservient role in their marriage and so was vilified as a sexually wanton night hag, and baby killer. Lilith takes place in a heightened present day, with Lilith working as a hotel room attendant: Adam runs the reception. Hotel guests Gloria and Ed have returned to the room where their daughter Eva was conceived some years earlier. Tragically, she was stillborn. Now, it is Ed’s fortieth birthday, and time to scatter Eva’s ashes. But can things go to plan when so much has been left unsaid and Lilith’s ancient fury is simmering just below the surface?

11 March – Living Wage Workshop with The Circle (Oxford)

For Oxford SU’s final Women*’s Week Event, The Circle are hosting a living wage workshop! We will be talking about fast fashion, consumer responsibility and how we can help. This session aims to encourage participants to think about their behaviour as consumers and inform on the progress of our living wage work.

19 March – For Sama (London)

On Thursday 19 March, join The Marie Colvin Journalists’ Network for a special event at Leighton House Museum, celebrating an exciting new partnership between MCJN and Waad’s campaign, Action For Sama. 

Come along for an evening of drinks, canapés and conversations, with a chance to hear from Waad herself, plus the opportunity to watch a screening of her groundbreaking documentary, ‘For Sama‘. This event is now sold out.

Photo: The Circle’s Annual Gathering 2019

31 March – Annual Gathering (London)

Our Annual Gathering is an opportunity to bring our valued members together to thank and acknowledge you all for your support in our work, as we reflect on our achievements over the past 12 months and share our plans and strategy for 2020. As we know from previous years, it’s also an event full of inspiration and motivation from the range of speakers and fellow guests. 

Last year we had the pleasure of hearing from Annie Lennox and Eve Ensler, women from across our projects and a range of members. Melanie, Santosh, Laura, Annie and Susan all described how they had brought their transferable skills, their connections, and their passion to be active global feminists through their membership with The Circle. 

This year we are incredibly excited to be joined by Helen Pankhurst CBE, an international development and women’s rights activist and writer. Helen is currently Care International’s Senior Advisor working in the UK and Ethiopia and her book, Deeds Not Words: The Story of Women’s Rights Then and Now was published in 2018. 

2 April – Book Launch: No Modernism without Lesbians with Diana Souhami (London)

The extraordinary story of a singular group of women in a pivotal time and place – Paris – between the wars – how the lesbian community fostered the shock of the new.

In the summer of 1945, just after the Nazi occupation, Truman Capote visited Romaine Brooks’s abandoned studio in Paris. The portraits there, large and imposing, were of women: Ida Rubinstein, Una Troubridge, Gluck, Elisabeth de Gramont, Renata Borgatti, Bryher. Romaine’s lover Natalie Barney said that Paris had been ‘the Sapphic Centre of the Western World’, and these women defined it. Capote himself called them ‘the all-time ultimate gallery of famous dykes’. This book is about that gallery and celebrates the central role they played in the cultural revolution that was Modernism. Free to attend! 

4 April – Periods: A Brief History (London) 

Periods: A Brief History will open at the Camden gallery in April, looking at stigmas and perceptions around menstruation. 

From Ancient Greece to the present day, the free exhibition will explore how attitudes towards menstruation have been impacted by culture, religion and lack of understanding, as well as tackling long-held taboos. 

Exhibition curator Sarah Creed said: “It is more pertinent now, more than ever, to be focusing on periods – menstrual health activism is growing throughout the world and the UK is no exception.” 

She highlighted the rise of campaigns from Free Periods getting free menstrual products into schools and colleges throughout the country, to grassroots charities such as Bloody Good Period, Red Box Project and Tricky Period. 

19 April – Feminism, Interrupted: Disrupting Power (London) 

More than just a slogan on a t-shirt, feminism is a radical tool for fighting back against structural violence and injustice. Feminism, Interrupted is a bold call to seize feminism back from the cultural gatekeepers and return it to its radical roots.

Lola Olufemi explores state violence against women, the fight for reproductive justice, transmisogyny, gendered Islamophobia and solidarity with global struggles, showing that the fight for gendered liberation can change the world for everybody when we refuse to think of it solely as women’s work. Including testimonials from Sisters Uncut, migrant groups working for reproductive justice, prison abolitionists and activists involved in the international fight for Kurdish and Palestinian rights, Olufemi emphasises the link between feminism and grassroots organisation.

Reclaiming feminism from the clutches of the consumerist, neoliberal model, Feminism, Interrupted shows that when ‘feminist’ is more than a label, it holds the potential for radical transformative work. 

30 April – Audre Lorde, The Berlin Years (London) 

Audre Lorde – the Berlin Years 1984 to 1992 documents Audre Lorde’s influence on the German political and cultural scene during a decade of profound social change, a decade that brought about the fall of the Berlin Wall and the re-unification of East and West Germany. This film chronicles an untold chapter of Lorde’s life: her empowerment of Afro-German women, as she challenged white women to acknowledge the significance of their white privilege and to deal with difference in constructive ways. 
Supported by Lorde’s example Afro-German women began to write their history and their stories and to form political networks on behalf of Black people in Germany. Film screening produced by The Batty Mama Film Club and in association with Evidence To Exist Research Group. 

 

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