Global Feminism Advent Calendar 2019

 

We’re back with a list of 24 things that you can do every day from now until Christmas. From feminist panel discussions and fundraisers for marginalised women and girls to arts and crafts sessions and inspirational films to watch. Many of these events will sell out, so be sure to get your tickets early!

1 December – Peta’s Chai Day in Wimbledon (London)

Join The Circle’s Relationship Manager Peta at her Chai Day in Wimbledon! Go along for some fantastic tea and cakes and to learn a little bit more about gender-based violence. This is a global issue and women’s organisations providing support to survivors are woefully underfunded.

Join Peta and friends on 1 Dec from 2-4pm at Coolangatta, 281 Kingston Road, Wimbledon Chase, SW20 8DB.

2 December – Active Bystander Training (London)

The Circle would like to invite you to attend the award-winning Active Bystander training programme which aims to empower us to challenge poor behaviours which have become normalised in our workplaces and in our communities and bring about change through the reinforcement of messages defining the boundaries of unacceptable behaviour. We have asked Scott Solder, an advanced communications skills expert to facilitate the session. We hope that you will find the training valuable!

3 December – Middle Eastern Women’s (Street)Art in Context (London)

Renowned curator Rose Issa and academic Lucia Sorbera end their third part series by reflecting on the aesthetic, conceptual and socio-political concerns of artists in the Arab world over the past four decades and the new shape of women’s street art, the challenges they face and the legacy of feminist revolutionary art.

4 December – Buy your ticket toTEDxLondonWomen 2019 (London)

TED are turning their attention to uncovering how women and non-binary and genderqueer people the world over are ‘Showing Up’, breaking out and pushing boundaries.

Whatever their focus and talent – business, technology, art, science, politics – these pioneers are joining forces in an explosion of discovery and ingenuity to drive real, meaningful change. Speakers include ANAÏS, Angela Francis, Dr Julia Shaw, Jamie Windust, Mary Portas, Nathaniel Cole, Nikita Gill and Onjali Rauf. Book your ticket now for this is sure to sell out!

5 December – Gender Critical Feminism in Public & Academic Discourse (Cambridge)

A panel of four academics will discuss the importance of understanding sex for women’s liberation, anti-intellectualism and misogyny in public and academic debate, and the influence of fear and the importance of women’s bravery.

This event is run by Cambridge Radical Feminist Network, who are a network of feminist students and Cambridge residents who meet to discuss feminism from a radical, materialist, gender critical perspective.

6 December –  Stonewall 50 Years On: Gay Liberation and Lesbian Feminism in Europe (Manchester)

2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in New York, which began in the early hours of Saturday, 28 June 1969, when patrons of the Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street defended themselves against police oppression.

This one-day conference rethinks the movements that the riots supposedly spawned in a European context. Gay liberation was never a one-way flow from across the Atlantic but the Gay Liberation Front was an important catalyst for similar groups in Europe.

This conference is co-organised with Dr Craig Griffiths, Dr Rebecca Jennings and Dr Dan Callwood.

7 December – Art + Feminism Edit-A-Thon Social (Nottingham)

Art + Feminism is a campaign improving coverage of gender, feminism, and the arts on Wikipedia. It is a do-it-yourself and do-it-with-others campaign teaching people of all gender identities and expressions to edit Wikipedia. Less than 10% editors on Wikipedia are women! The group wants to ensure that women tell their stories and that gaps in the coverage of knowledge about gender, feminism, and the arts on one of the most visited websites in the world.

8 December – Christmas Period Pack and Volunteer Session (Wolverhampton)

Looking to get involved and discover how you can help reduce period poverty in Wolverhampton? Join Homeless Period to help pack donations and deliver them to vulnerable women and girls and those experiencing period poverty across the city.

9 December – Sex Positive Christmas Market (London)

Looking for a unique Christmas gift? Head to this sex positive, feminist and queer friendly space where you can buy alternative gifts, meet lovely people. There will be great music, mulled wine and a raffle so this is not to be missed.

10 December –  Smashing Stereotypes! Inspiring Young People in Gender Equality (Wishaw)

This event is aimed at young people and individuals or groups who work with young people in a range of capacities from the voluntary and statutory sectors. The interactive displays and workshops will highlight current research about gender stereotyping and provide an opportunity to engage with the material, interact with peers and representatives from different sectors.

This workshop is being held by STAMP (Stamp out Media Patriarchy) a project which aims to tackles gender stereotypes in the media and encourage more positive use of the media amongst young people.

This event is completely free – just register to reserve your place!

11 December – Buy your ticket to Night for Solidarity for Refugees in Calais (London)

The refugee crisis is a feminist issue and Hackney Stand Up to Racism and Facism are holding their annual fundraiser for Care4Calais. The evening will feature music, comedy, a raffle and speakers all in aid of the work Care4Calais do. Winter has started and for those living in the appalling conditions in Calais there are no ways to get warm. Please support their cause and attend this fantastic fundraiser on 14 December.

12 December – Bitch Lit: Corregidora by Gayl Jones (London)

Bitch Lit is Gower Street Waterstone’s monthly book club devoted to new feminist writing and cult classics by women. Join them for wine and a lively discussion led by literary critic Lucy Scholes.

This will be the final Bitch Lit of the year and the group will be discussing the lost classic Corregidora by Gayl Jones

13 December – Hand in your Chai Day money!

Once you’ve hosted your Chai Day to support survivors of gender-based violence, remember to hand in the money that you’ve fundraised! This will go directly to our Chai Day projects and can be donated via the link on the Chai Day webpage. You can also find us on Virgin Money Giving.

14 December – Flo Perry ‘How to have Feminist Sex’ (Oxford)

This book talk discusses women’s own patriarchal conditioning in relation to their bodies and sexuality, arguing that this can be the hardest enemy to defeat as feminism moves forward. When it comes to our sex lives, few of us are free of niggling fears and body image insecurities. Flo Perry explores body-positive sex and dispels myths with the goal of getting more people to talk openly about what they do and don’t want from every romantic encounter.

Flo will be taking questions and signing copies of her book after the talk!

15 December – Watch City of Joy on Netflix

How does one find joy amid unspeakable tragedy? Madeleine Gavin’s documentary City of Joy, about a community built around women who have survived horrific violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), gives us a glimpse at both an incredible injustice still occurring today, and how Congolese women are combating it with their own grassroots movement.

“Everything is about love at City of Joy,” Schuler Deschryver told the Guardian. She described how many of the women who first arrive at City of Joy associate being touched only with violence. “So when you hug her and tell her she’s beautiful, that you love her, that you will fight for her, suddenly she’s like: ‘Oh my God, I exist. I’m a human being.’ You see the joy that [the women] have and know what they’ve passed through. I think that’s one of the reasons I wake up every morning.”

Find it on Netflix now!

16 December – Buy a gift that supports marginalised women and girls

Adorn yourself or a loved one with an elegant and unique piece of jewellery from the SeeMe X The Circle collection. See Me and The Circle have launched a beautiful and ethically-made jewellery collection to celebrate ten years of Women Empowering Women. SeeMe employs women, often single mothers, who have suffered violence and were ostracised from their communities in Tunisia. Through training SeeMe employees learn the craft of jewellery making following ancient Tunisian techniques. Therefore, while fostering their country’s traditions, they also secure a workplace for themselves and a future for their families.

The Circle have a number of sustainably sourced gifts for every member of the family, in addition to jewellery we’re selling programmes from Annie Lennox’s An Evening of Music and Conversation.

17 December – Donate unused beauty products to gift to Women for Refugee Women

Women for Refugee Women is working to widen our beauty giving this season by appealing for donations of unwanted or unused beauty products for refugee women. The organisation supports women who are seeking refuge from persecution to rebuild their lives and communicate their own stories. “It’s an industry that generates so much surplus,” says director Natasha Walker, “like many women, I am sometimes given beauty stuff that I just don’t use. I thought it would be good for women in need to be able to benefit from this and properly enjoy what the rest of us take for granted.

18 December – Share your #GlobalFeminism stat

Take part in Annie Lennox’s #GlobalFeminism campaign by selecting that exemplifies the inequalities women face across the world, write it down and photograph yourself with it. Then, share the photo on your social media, hashtag #GlobalFeminism and tag both @thecirclengo and @AnnieLennox.

19 December – Read our Living Wage Report

Fast fashion generates vast revenues, using a business model that turns around enormous quantities of cheap clothing produced with very short lead times by globally-sourced cheap labour. Multinational fast fashion companies are able to quickly move their production to countries with lower wages. The risk of losing this investment acts as a disincentive for countries to improve their labour laws and provide fair wages.

The Circle has recently published its second report on this issue which makes a proposal for a new legislative framework to stop the “race to the bottom” and ensure a living wage. Read the full report now!

20 December – Donate sanitary products to a local food bank or body shop

Period products are not cheap and for anyone menstruating they are an absolute necessity. Sadly, there are many people living in the UK who are unable to afford them. People often forget about this essential item when donating to food banks so if you are thinking about donating food and other supplies then consider including some tampons or sanitary pads! The Body Shop have started a fantastic initiative in partnership with Bloody Good Period which can currently be found in several cities across the UK. Find your closest participating store here or food bank here.

21 December – Gift a Membership

Last minute Christmas gift? Gift a membership!!

We have added the option to Gift a Membership on our website! Whether the recipient is your mother, your daughter, an aunt, a colleague, a partner or friend; The Circle membership is the perfect gift for a woman who wants to become more actively involved in the global women’s movement, bring attention to important issues and amplifying the voices of vulnerable women. The perfect Christmas gift of empowerment this year!

22 December – Watch For Sama

For Sama is both an intimate and epic journey into the female experience of war. A love letter from a young mother to her daughter, the film tells the story of Waad al-Kateab’s life through five years of uprising in Aleppo, Syria as she falls in love, gets married and gives birth to Sama, all while cataclysmic conflict rises around her.

Her camera captures incredible stories of loss, laughter and survival as Waad wrestles with an impossible choice – whether or not to flee the city to protect her daughter’s life.

23 December – Save a pre-loved item for Jumble Fever in January!

After the huge success of The Oxford Circle’s Jumble Fever last January, they are back again but this year, in the Oxford Town Hall, to raise funds for the Nonceba Family Counselling Centre. Collect your preloved items, jumble and bric a brac and set it aside to make room for Christmas gifts! If you bring a bag of donations with you, entry to the Jumble Sale is just £1.

24 December – Listen to the Cry Power Podcast with Annie Lennox

Catch Annie on the first episode of Hozier’s new podcast series Cry Power in partnership with our friends at Global Citizen. You can listen here!

The Cry Power podcast is hosted by Hozier in partnership with Global Citizen, talking to inspirational artists and activists about how to change the world. In its inaugural episode, Hozier talks with Annie Lennox about why feminism must be inclusive of men; how her personal story of activism is rooted in her family; and how music can make change happen. But it’s not all talk — you can join the Global Citizen movement and take action below to end gender inequality all over the world. Subscribe on AppleSpotify, or Acast now.

Have a wonderful festive period from everyone here at The Circle! 


The Circle’s Living Wage Symposium

Photo credit: Nader Elgadi

On 8 November, we continued our work to ensure a Living Wage for the millions of women working in the garment industry by convening a symposium to bring together those with the same aim. We were joined at Pinsent Masons by incredible change-makers and enjoyed discussions from the legal, investment, corporate and NGO sectors as well as academics, and policy makers including Jessica Simor QC, ASOS, Continental Clothing, BMO Global Asset management, ASN Bank, Kempen, ACT Coalition, Fair Wear and Clean Clothes Campaign amongst others.

 

We began the day hearing from our keynote speaker, the inspirational Anannya Bhaattacharjee, founder and President of the Garment and Allied workers union in Northern India. Anannya encouraged the room to push forward ‘the theme of solutions’ on the urgent issue of a living wage. She also took the opportunity to remind us of the abuse that happens throughout supply chains that is facilitated by the lack of a living wage and the fact that many consumers are unaware of the true cost of garments. The need for increased transparency was a key theme throughout the day and came up again and again across all of our panels.

“Fashion brands are the drivers of the supply chain” – Anannya Bhaattacharjee

Jessica Simor QC, the legal driving force behind our second report, used her opening speech as an opportunity to remind us that the industry is an uneven playing field. This environment is one that works against brands that want to do better in their supply chains and began the conversation of what structural changes need to be made to allow retailers, investors and individuals to introduce a living wage within their supply chains without losing their competitive edge.

 

Our different panels spoke from positions of experience across many difference fields and with a varied wealth of knowledge. However, many of our speakers spoke about how important legislation that the report outlines will be in achieving the living wage, how transparency for the consumer but also for regulatory boards is vital, and discussed different methodologies on how to implement legislation with ‘teeth’.

“The poorer you are the more vulnerable you are and the more vulnerable you are the more exploited you are …. so a living wage makes a real difference from the ground up” – Adil Rehman

 

Melanie Hall, QC, Ambassador for The Circle, and Livia Firth, Founder of Eco-Age and Ambassador for The Circle closed the day with some incredibly poignant speeches. Livia quoted lecturer and author, Naomi Tyrell, “nothing will ever change unless there is a transnational agreement on wages, otherwise the companies will keep hopping from one country to the other, in pursuit of the cheapest bargain.” This is the argument outlined in our report launched at the event wage changes must be made simultaneously and region-wide to ensure that brands cannot continue to the “race to the bottom” in countries that simply cannot turn down the employment provided by the fashion industry.

 

All those involved in this report understand that there will be obstacles and there will be resistance, but as our Ambassador Melanie Hall closed with:

“Everyone has a part to play, everyone in this room today is a consumer”

A huge thank you to all of our speakers and to JJ Charitable Trust and Pinsent Mason for their support in making this symposium happen. Keep an eye on The Circle’s website and social media for updates on our living wage work. You can read the full report here.


The Afternoon Show: Annie Lennox

Photo credit: Annie Lennox and Janice Forsyth on stage during An Evening of Music and Conversation

“This felt like Glasgow was the locus for an international event”

 

Janice Forsyth and journalist Paul English discuss Annie Lennox: An Evening of Music and Conversation at SEC Armadillo on BBC Sounds, speaking to audience members from all over the world and recalling highlights of the night. The Circle are so incredibly grateful to Annie, the audience and everyone who was involved in the running of this spectacular event.

You can listen to the full conversation now!

 

 


#SecondHandSeptember with The Circle Members and Volunteers

The average lifespan for an item of clothing in the UK is only 2.2 years. UK consumers send 11 million items a week to landfill, that’s over 5.5k tonnes of clothing a week (300k tonnes each year) – truly shocking.

To keep prices low, garment workers are often not paid a living wage… these are people from the poorest communities around the world, and this unfair treatment makes it impossible for them to work their way out of poverty.

Some of our team, members and volunteers have shared their favourite secondhand items to celebrate #SecondHandSeptember!

Georgia (Volunteer)

“I bought this bag from Pop Boutique in Leeds. This store is amazing for unusual vintage finds, especially bags. In this photo I wore it for a day out but I love it for an evening bag due to the strap length, unusual shape and the deep chestnut brown colour making it really stand out. I had been searching for a bag like this for ages and was so excited to come across it.”

Chloe (Volunteer)

Chloe is a social media volunteer for The Music Circle who is currently travelling around the world! “I just bought my new favourite dress for 20 reais (£4) in Río de Janeiro!”

Elsa (Member)

“My mum wore this top throughout the 70s and it’s still in pristine condition. It’s an A-shape cotton top, and from the embroidery work over the chest and bottom pocket area, I expect it’s from India. My Mum was Australian and the country imported many bohemian-style items from India in the 70s. It has a grainy texture which I love and have not found in any other item, ever! This is why, in addition to having family history, this top is special to me.

I am lucky enough to have been brought up with sustainable values. For example, my parents never gifted me plastic toys and favoured items that lasted. The same went for clothes: I wore many good-quality hand-me-downs from my sister.

As a result of my upbringing, I’ve not needed to hugely change my consumption habits – I buy as few clothes as possible, and choose items that are ethical and sustainable, like the Stella McCartney denim skirt in the photo which I will keep wearing forever.
Given how little information was disseminated at the time about fashion’s impact on people and the environment, I consider my parents to be pioneers in how they viewed everything, and everyone, as inter-related.”

Anna (Projects and Communications Officer)

“My mum wore this dress to a wedding before I was born! We were doing a bit of a clear out and she’s passed it on to me. I’m trying to increasingly buy secondhand, especially when there are so many great charity shops and vintage markets in London.”

Edie (Volunteer)

“I had a huge vintage clothing haul last time I was in Manchester and found loads of great dresses, shirts and even a pair of jeans. I love this dress and wore it when I went on holiday to Paris.”

Shop secondhand! Why not challenge yourself not to buy any new clothes for the month of September? Alternatively, support the ’30 Wears Campaign’ started by our Ambassador Livia Firth by challenging yourself to ask the question “will I wear this 30 times?” before making a new purchase. The 30 Wears Challenge is a great way to contribute to a more sustainable fashion world. You don’t need to give up buying the clothes you love or spend your days researching how ethical a company is

Read more about our Living Wage work, which sets out the legal argument that a living wage is a fundamental human right, and that companies and governments have a responsibility to uphold this right, by clicking here.

#WomenEmpoweringWomen #GlobalFeminism


Global Feminist Calendar September and October 2019

Photo Credit: March4Women

In addition to The Circle’s own events taking place throughout Autumn, there are plenty of feminist events happening in your area. So get inspired!

5 September – GalCal IRL – Community (London)

Get to know that Instagram friend, that artist, the founder and more. This is your opportunity to talk about the power of real conversations with talented people, getting right to the straight talk, a chance to really network and understand the importance.

Taking place at Peckham Levels, meet a new network of inspiring women!

8 September – Stretch in Solidarity (London)

As part of fundraising for the Great River Race, one of our members is hosting a charity yoga day to raise money for Nonceba Family Counselling Centre in South Africa.

The team have set themselves an ambitious fundraising target and in addition to donations, Vasiliki is holding a series of yoga events at The Power Yoga Company for those who want to support her in achieving her target and do a little yoga.

There is a minimum donation of £5 and only 30 spaces so its first come, first served.

10 September – The Period is Political (London)

In preparation to galvanise period activism across the country (world?), Bloody Good Period invites you to The Period Is Political.

Yes! Led by Gabby Edlin, the founded of Bloody Good Period, the panel discussion will be involving the US menstrual equity activist Jennifer Weiss Wolf, The Body Shop’s Head of Brand Activism Jessie Macneil-Brown, and #endtampontax campaigner Laura Coryton.

12 September – Brave Education for Trafficking Prevention (Calgary)

A night of optimism, empowerment and jaw dropping performances in Calgary to raise funds for the victims of trafficking. There will be a silent auction where you can win incredible prizes and a number of talks from activists and experts in the field.

By supporting BRAVE Education programs, you are helping provide life-saving prevention education in schools and communities. Our Goal is to have sex trafficking prevention education included in curriculum for all Alberta children from Grades 4 and up, given the average age of recruitment is 12-14, across all demographics.

Get your tickets now!

14 September – The Great River Race (London)

Members and friends of The London Circle, a collective within The Circle, will be rowing the Great River Race in September to raise funds for The Circle to go towards supporting the Nonceba Family Counselling Centre in South Africa. They will be completing this challenge in a dragon boat, a skill new to the entire team, who will be training hard over the coming months.

The Great River Race is London’s River Marathon, a spectacular boat race along the River Thames that attracts over 330 crews from across the globe.
For the seventeen women who are taking part, this will surely be a challenge. Although some are experienced rowers, none of them have ever paddled a dragon boat before and regardless of ability, they will all be pushing themselves for a fantastic cause.

There is still time to donate to the team, or how about going to cheer them on?

19 September – Bloody Funny (London)

On September 19th, join the Bloody Good family for an extra special evening maxi-packed full of menstrual centred comedy, hosted by Jen Brister for Bloody Good Period.

Join Felicity Ward, Josie Long, Sophie Duker, Bridget Christie, Rosie Jones, Rose Matafeo and Ingrid Dahle at Union Chapel for an evening full of stand-up. Tell your pals, bring your pads and get ready for an evening full of all thing’s menstruation.

26 September – Annie Lennox: An Evening of Music and Conversation (Glasgow)

Following the resounding success of the first evening held in March 2018 at Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London – Annie Lennox will once again share thoughts, memories and reflections during an event of conversation, musical performance and visual imagery on 26th September 2019.

We are absolutely thrilled that Annie will be doing this event again to raise funds and awareness for us and our work. All proceeds from the evening ‘Annie Lennox – An Evening of Music and Conversation’ will be donated to The Circle to help us create transformative change in the lives of girls and women facing the challenges of gender disempowerment across the globe.

Unfortunately, this event is now sold out.

27 September – The Oxford Circle X After Hours (Oxford)

From September, The Oxford Circle will be rolling out a regular programme of events and are inviting you to join them for their next event, The Oxford Circle x After Hours at The Ashmolean.

Network with incredible women, enjoy live music, and enjoy the surroundings of some of the exquisite Ashmolean galleries. There will be a cash bar, and we will be running a raffle with prizes donated by local businesses to raise money for The Oxford Circle’s current project, the Nonceba Women’s Shelter.

2 October – Global Feminism: Amá (London)

Amá is a feature length documentary which tells an important and untold story: the abuses committed against Native American women by the United States Government during the 1960’s and 70’s: removed from their families and sent to boarding schools, forced relocation away from their traditional lands and involuntary sterilization.

The Circle are screening this incredible film as part of our Global Feminism film series. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the Director, Lorna Tucker who will be joined by Charon Asetoyer.

3 October – Chai Day Launch (London)

We would like to invite our members to the launch of our Chai Day 2019 campaign. This evening will be an opportunity to network with fellow members, learn more about our Chai Day projects and hear from some incredible speakers, including Isabelle Kerr from Glasgow and Clyde Rape Crisis.

We hope that you will join us on 3 October to show your support for the survivors of gender-based violence and that you leave feeling inspired to host a Chai Day to raise vital funds for our projects.

5 October – New Suns Feminist Book Fair (London)

A bookfair and day of talks, workshops and screenings, exploring contemporary feminism and technology.

The day will include workshops, talks and screenings exploring technofeminism, storytelling, sonic ritual, gender identity, reproductive justice and indigenous knowledge with writers, artists, mystics, poets and academics. In the spirit of the 1980s international feminist bookfairs, there will also be over thirty stalls to explore across Level G, and selected events for free.

6 October – Invisible Women (Manchester)

Join campaigner Caroline Criado-Perez as she chats to Alex Clark about her new book, Invisible Women. The book explores the data biases that impact on women’s lives and health – from the use of male crash test dummies to the temperature of our offices, so many things have been designed with men in mind. What would the world look like if things were a bit more equitable?

16 October – Girl Space (Leeds)

A day festival celebrating and showcasing female creatives.

The day will include performances from dancers, an art exhibition and a number of workshops, a skate workshop, panel discussions, djs, spoken word and much more!

Head down to Hyde Park Book Club for this event!

23 October – In Our Own Words: Women of Colour in Scottish Media (Glasgow)

Throughout history, black women’s voices have been missing from the media. New platforms offer opportunities to hear new voices, and BBC’s the Social is one way that women of colour have reached new audiences for their work. Join Gender Equal to hear from contributors to the Social, revisit their work, and explore questions around creative freedoms, precarious work, and speaking out.

24 October – The Lawyers Circle Networking (London)

Connect with other like-minded women at The Lawyers Circle’s first networking event to discuss how our legal community can do even more to support and empower marginalised women.

Join us on the 24 October at Stewarts for an evening of bubbles, networking and thought-provoking speakers. Please bring along any friends or colleagues who may also want to join


Difficult Conversations: Human Trafficking

Photo credit: UN Women/Stuart Mannion

The Circle are in partnership with Eco-Age to champion women’s rights globally and promote Global Feminism, our Difficult Conversations series investigates the facts and figures of some of the most difficult global topics affecting women worldwide and, critically, highlight how you can get involved with driving change.

In today’s focus, The Circle’s Anna Renfrew and filmmaker and member of The Circle Anya Camilleri discuss the facts surrounding human trafficking following the UN’s World Day Against Trafficking in Persons, and what you can do to help.

“Human trafficking is a vast, insidious and incredibly profitable industry that takes place in almost every country across the world. Contrary to popular belief and depictions of trafficking in contemporary media, according to the UN, no country can claim that trafficking does not happen within its borders as either a country of origin, transit or destination for victims. Trafficking is a lucrative business as it produces steady profits over a long period of time as humans may be sold repeatedly and continue to work and earn money for their owners.

While it is important to remember that trafficking does not only refer to sexual exploitation but also other kinds of forced labour including agricultural work, as with many examples of exploitation, women and girls are disproportionately affected. According to the ILO, women and girls account for 99% of trafficking victims in the commercial sex industry and make up an estimated 71% of total trafficking victims.

The U.S Government conservatively reported that 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders each year with almost half estimated to be minors. As with any illicit activity, these numbers will only ever be an estimate, yet the demand for younger and younger girls is increasing as younger victims are deemed as being less likely to carry a sexually transmitted disease. Devastatingly, young girls are most susceptible to poor conditions and health risks and are the least able to resist.

This begs the question, how do women and girls become victims of trafficking?”

Read the full article here!

#WomenEmpoweringWomen #GlobalFeminism


Cybersex Trafficking

Photo credit: International Justice Misson

This month at The Circle, we have delved deeper into the issue of human trafficking and have learnt a huge amount from our project partner ACT Alberta about what makes women vulnerable to traffickers and what we can do ourselves to be more aware of trafficking victims in our own area. There are more people trapped in slavery than ever before in human history and in the following article, our volunteer Georgia takes a closer look at one of modern slavery’s most insidious practices, cybersex trafficking.

“We were left with no choice but to follow her instructions.” – Joy, a victim of cybersex trafficking for 7 years (10-17)

 

More than 40 million people are victim to different forms of slavery such as forced labour, child labour, domestic servitude and forced marriage. This month The Circle have been working to raise awareness of human trafficking among modern slavery, particularly for sex. According to the UK charity Anti-Slavery International, “human trafficking involves recruitment, harbouring or transporting people into a situation of exploitation through the use of violence, deception or coercion and forced to work against their will.” What’s more, there is another form of human trafficking which is increasing at a frightening rate.

“Cybersex trafficking is an emerging threat as internet access increases everywhere. Now, paedophiles anywhere in the world can direct live sexual abuse of boys and girls hidden in private homes.” (IJM)

 

Social Affairs Correspondent for The Independent, May Bulman, reported in November 2017 about a “new form of human trafficking that sees children forced to carry out sex acts while being live-streamed for paedophiles to watch online [which] is growing at an ‘alarming rate’, a charity has warned”. A victim as young as a two-month-old baby was reported.

The stories that victims have told of this injustice are extremely hard to read. International Justice Mission (IJM) is the largest anti-slavery organisation in the world. They work to rescue and rehabilitate victims of human trafficking among modern slavery. In February 2017 they posted a YouTube video called “What is Cybersex Trafficking?” where they explained how “Pedophiles and predators use the internet to abuse children in homes and cybercafes.” According to Alex Ilusoriio who is an Investigator with IJM Philippines, for as little as 100 dollars Western customers can watch children under 5 years old being abused by adults. This horrific and unspeakable form of abuse is destroying the lives of vulnerable children. IJM helps victims to share their stories in order to raise awareness. Just less than a year ago on 13th August 2018, IJM revealed the year-long investigation which resulted in the rescue of two young women, a teenage boy and a 12-year-old girl. One can only imagine the psychological damage as a result of this devastating crime. At the time of this report the children were receiving help from social workers.

On 20th February 2019 three operations took place to rescue 16 children over four days. Officers discovered that a man called Herman Arnett Ross, an American living in Pampanga, was “seeking to sexually exploit a teenage girl”. Days before Ross was arrested, IJM rescued 15 other children across the Philippines. The children are now receiving trauma therapy, revealing the heart-breaking psychological pain that victims of human trafficking are forced to endure.

IJM have stated cybersex trafficking to be an ‘emerging threat’. Indeed, according to this charity, a ‘simple internet connection’, ‘a webcam’ or ‘a mobile phone’ is all that is required for this form of sexual exploitation to take place and as internet access increases, so will this form of human trafficking.

Annie Kelly is a human rights journalist for the Guardian and Observer, also editor of the Guardian’s Modern-day slavery in focus series. Kelly reported for the Guardian in October 2018 on the case where “two women had been paid £33,000 by [Alain] Charlwood-Collings for procuring children as young as four and filming their rape and abuse. Some of the 46 children involved were the women’s own children or sisters. Others were the children of neighbours, or from the wider local community.” This took place for 10 years.

The fact that the abusers can hide for such a long period of time, shows how complex these operations are to report, find and arrest them. There are signs we can look out for in order to identify if a person is being exploited. According to Stop The Traffik, significant signs of sexual exploitation can include:

  • Having English vocabulary of only sexualised words
  • Emotional trauma as a result of their work
  • Restricted or no access to earnings
  • At a location the letterbox or doors of the property may appear to have been sealed from the inside

What can we do?

 

To understand more about how to spot the signs of sexual exploitation please visit this detailed page by Stop The Traffik.

Every month IJM reports one or more new cases of cybersex trafficking. This is just one charity alone. You can read the recent case reported last week on 25th July 2019 which highlights how this is a “a global crime that demands global collaboration.

By being aware we can all help to prevent these inhumane crimes. Joy, who I quoted at the beginning of this article, is now using her experience to help others. Joy argues that she believes slavery can be stopped: “I want it to stop. I believe it can stop, but I cannot do it alone.”

We can all be a part of this global collaboration and knowing just one of the signs above could potentially save a someone from unimaginable abuse.

“A Feminist is anyone who recognizes the equality and full humanity of women and men.” – Gloria Steinem

 

#WomenEmpoweringWomen #GlobalFeminism

This article was written by Georgia Bridgett who is an intern for The Circle. Georgia is a recent English graduate and is passionate about women’s rights and the underlying issues in the fast-fashion industry.

 


Women of Syria

 

Zaina Erhaim is an award- winning Syrian journalist and feminist working as a senior media specialist with the Institute of War and Peace Reporting (IWPR). Zaina received the first Annita Auspurg award: Rebel Woman For Peace By WILFP, named the journalist of the year by Reporters without Borders in 2015, one of the 100 Most Powerful Arab Women according to Arabian Business and the Unsung heroes of 2016 by Reuters Thomson.

In 2017 she launched “Liberated T”, a Syrian advocacy campaign that aims to change the negative gender stereotypes imposed mainly by our society on women, it focuses on the Syrian women’s stories, battles, and experiences.

Liberated T’s goals are to:

  • Engage women and women in discussions about gender roles, social suppression and stereotyping, women’s work, obstacles, struggle, and extra layers of suppression and difficulties, they face.
  • Help women and men to develop their tools to express their understanding of their gender roles, and what they are doing to impose the traditional harsh ones on themselves and others.
  • Raise topics regarding gender, women and misogyny in simple practical ways as topics of debate, and to produce and exchange content about them.
  • Form a virtual lobby for the women trying to engage in the Syrian public sphere, support others who got harassed or bullied and train on online and off-line campaigning methods to do so.
  • Advocate for the women taking leading (peaceful/not engaged in war) roles in Syria, for the rights of girls to go to schools, not to be formed into marriage, and to choose what they want to be.

Since then, the campaign has gone from strength to strength. Below are some of the incredibly inspiring stories of Syrian women living inside Syria and still working and helping out their communities in different ways.

Ghada Bakeer

Ghada Bakeer was a teacher before the revolution. Married to an abusive man, she was excluded from political participation. Today, she is still living in Syria and working to support her community.

Ghalia Rahhal

Ghalia Rahhal is the founder of “Mazaya” women’s organisation in Northern Syria which includes eight centres for women that provide awareness, and vocational and educational courses.

Eba Toma

Eba Toma is just 21 year olds, but she began working as a nurse during the revolution. Hear her story:

The Circle supports some of the world’s most disempowered women and girls. Find out more about our upcoming events here and how you can support us in our mission of equality for women and girls in a fairer world here.

#GlobalFeminism #WomenEmpoweringWomen


Remarkable Women Awards 2019

Annie Lennox receives the Icon Award at Stylist’s Remarkable Women Awards. The audience were so inspired by her acceptance speech that Stylist have written an article about it:

“Annie Lennox is absolutely an icon. And, at Stylist’s Remarkable Women Awards 2019, Keeley Hawes – aka Julia Montague from BBC One’s Bodyguard – stepped up to present the musician and activist with the prestigious Icon Award.

Noting that Lennox won a place at the Royal Academy of Music in London in the early Seventies and, as one half of The Eurythmics, became one of the most loved British artists around the world, Hawes went on to inform the star-studded audience at London’s Rosewood Hotel that “it’s not Lennox’s music that makes her our winner tonight… although it is worthy of such an honour.”

Rather, “it is the way that she has used her status and platform to help so many other people, especially women,” continued Hawes.”

Read the full article here.

#WomenEmpoweringWomen #GlobalFeminism


Job Opportunity at The Circle

Project Manager

One of the priorities for us at The Circle is to ensure that the millions of women working in the garment industry receive a living wage.

 We began this work by publishing, in May 2017, a report that sets out the argument that a living wage is a fundamental right.  We’ve also created a strategy to guide our work in this area that has the following three key objectives –

1)      Continue a gear shift in the debate on the living wage that will engage key stakeholders with tangible alternatives to the status quo.

2)      Formulate and test a new legal directive that will oblige garments/fashion companies to pay a living wage in the countries they source from.

3)      Create a race to the top in which companies compete to demonstrate best practice in complying with the law 

We’re now looking for a Project Manager to work with our Living Wage steering group that includes Livia Firth. Jessica Simor QC, Antonella Centra and our Executive Director Sioned Jones to implement and co-ordinate this strategy

The post holder will co-ordinate and build our relationships with a broader group of allies and partners and liaise with them to ensure we remain cohesive and empathetic to each others work in regards to a living wage.

The post is initially a consultancy contract for 1 to 2 days a week over a 3-6 month period (the days and timelines are flexible to suit the individual and to meet our budget).  There is a desire to seek longer term funding and the post-holder will also assist, with Sioned, in seeking out and securing this funding.  Should we be successful we would wish the project manager role to continue beyond this pilot phase. 

We’re ideally looking for some with experience of working in this area or at the very least enormous passion and knowledge about ending the issues facing women working in the fast fashion industry.  Experience of policy making and long term advocacy would be useful in the role alongside managing a similar type of project.  The person must be self motivated as it will be a home based role with some travel to London working within a small team.  Organised with good communications skills the post holder must be confident working with a range of individuals including those at a very senior and influential level.  From our work to date we know this post holder will need to be tenacious and have the commitment and ability to keep things on course and take new opportunities when they may arise with short notice.

To find out more email hello@thecircle.ngo or to apply send your CV and covering letter to the same email address giving an indication of your availability and daily rate.  Applications will be considered as they are submitted and we will appoint as soon as a suitable candidate is found.