8 Women’s Rights Books to Choose from this Spring

 

Our mission at The Circle is to bring women together, defend women’s rights and give them a voice. Here are eight books by authors who do just that, to get you feeling inspired for the spring…

1. Jess Phillips, Everywoman: One Woman’s Truth About Speaking the Truth

Jess Phillips is bold, she’s unapologetic, and she’s out to empower women. From violence to sisterhood to building a career, Phillips tackles her themes head on, providing gritty insight and no-nonsense advice. Her underlying message? “We’re women and we’re kick-ass. And that’s the truth”.

2. Anne Elizabeth Moore, Threadbare: Clothes, Sex, and Trafficking

From the sweatshops of Cambodia to the ateliers of Vienna, Moore takes us on a whirlwind tour of the sex and garment supply chain in this beautifully illustrated feminist zine. She examines the fraught interplay between gender, labour and production, highlighting individual voices to show the true cost of fast fashion. The result is a practical guide to a growing human rights problem too pressing to ignore…

3. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Dear Ijeawele, Or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

In her most recent work, Adichie offers fifteen feminist principles – guidelines, as it were – to a friend, the soon-to-be mother of a baby girl. Though addressed to Ijeawele, Adichie’s suggestions are universally applicable: we could all benefit from questioning social norms, or being more open about female sexuality. Adichie’s writing is warm, frank and inspiring.

4. Hibo Wardere, Cut: One Woman’s Fight Against FGM in Britain Today

This powerful, devastating work aims to shed light on the oft-overlooked issue of female genital mutilation. Wardere shares her personal journey, from her cutting as a six-year-old to her present role as an outspoken anti-FGM campaigner. A vital read.

5. Malala Yousafzai, I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World

A tireless advocate for girls’ education and equal opportunities, Malala here tracks her journey from war-torn Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. I Am Malala shows the potential of young women and girls; this one will inspire a generation.

6. Sue Lloyd-Roberts, The War on Women: And the Brave Ones Who Fight Back

During her forty years as a video journalist, Sue Lloyd-Roberts met women who were victim to unspeakable atrocities, from rape to FGM to honour killings to imprisonment. Here, she gives voice to the forgotten women, and to those who fought back. A must-read from one of the most acclaimed TV journalists of her generation.

7. Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

Set in a dystopian totalitarian future, The Handmaid’s Tale offers a terrifying glimpse of what happens when the legislation of women’s bodies is taken to extremes. Now a major TV series, Atwood’s chilling narrative is as relevant today as it was thirty years ago.

8. Julie Bindel, The Pimping of Prostitution: Abolishing the Sex Work Myth

Justice for Women co-founder Julie Bindel spent two years travelling the world, meeting pimps, pornographers, sex workers and abolitionists in a bid to uncover the truth about the sex trade. The Pimping of Prostitution is the remarkable result of her journey.

 

Written by Jessi Wells, volunteer and member of The Circle.

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